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The Mango Season

The Mango Season From the acclaimed author of A Breath of Fresh Air this beautiful novel takes us to modern India during the height of the summer s mango season Heat passion and controversy explode as a woman is fo

  • Title: The Mango Season
  • Author: Amulya Malladi
  • ISBN: 9780345450319
  • Page: 177
  • Format: Paperback
  • From the acclaimed author of A Breath of Fresh Air, this beautiful novel takes us to modern India during the height of the summer s mango season Heat, passion, and controversy explode as a woman is forced to decide between romance and tradition.Every young Indian leaving the homeland for the United States is given the following orders by their parents Don t eat any cow From the acclaimed author of A Breath of Fresh Air, this beautiful novel takes us to modern India during the height of the summer s mango season Heat, passion, and controversy explode as a woman is forced to decide between romance and tradition.Every young Indian leaving the homeland for the United States is given the following orders by their parents Don t eat any cow It s still sacred , don t go out too much, save and save, and save your money, and most important, do not marry a foreigner Priya Rao left India when she was twenty to study in the U.S and she s never been back Now, seven years later, she s out of excuses She has to return and give her family the news She s engaged to Nick Collins, a kind, loving American man It s going to break their hearts.Returning to India is an overwhelming experience for Priya When she was growing up, summer was all about mangoes ripe, sweet mangoes, bursting with juices that dripped down your chin, hands, and neck But after years away, she sweats as if she s never been through an Indian summer before Everything looks dirtier than she remembered And things that used to seem natural a buffalo strolling down a newly laid asphalt road, for example now feel totally chaotic.But Priya s relatives remain the same Her mother and father insist that it s time they arranged her marriage to a nice Indian boy Her extended family talks of nothing but marriage particularly the marriage of her uncle Anand, which still has them reeling Not only did Anand marry a woman from another Indian state, but he also married for love Happiness and love are not the point of her grandparents or her parents union In her family s rule book, duty is at the top of the list.Just as Priya begins to feel she can t possibly tell her family that she s engaged to an American, a secret is revealed that leaves her stunned and off balance Now she is forced to choose between the love of her family and Nick, the love of her life.As sharp and intoxicating as sugarcane juice bought fresh from a market cart, The Mango Season is a delightful trip into the heart and soul of both contemporary India and a woman on the edge of a profound life change.

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      Published :2018-05-25T18:15:26+00:00

    1 thought on “The Mango Season

    1. A catchy and quick story about Indian traditions and rules, sprinkled with humor.After seven years away from India, Priya sees everything with different eyes: the biases of her family, the scorching heat, the filth in the streets, the traffic.But, despite this, she hasn't freed herself completely of her upbringing and hardly finds the courage to tell her family about her American fiancee. I sometimes was irritated with Priya's childish reactions and outbursts of fury, failing to present her case [...]

    2. When I was recommended this book, I was told that it has a 'wow' ending. Reading the book, I started to fear what kind of 'wow' the person was referring to, because I had my own wish on how this book should have ended. And I was relieved when I got to the end and my fears were not fulfilled. The Mango Season is just another book about the Indian traditions, the rules of the family, the arranged marriages and the expectations that parents have from their children. Except that this book is not you [...]

    3. Indian girl moves to America. Falls in love with an American boy. Worries that her traditional family won’t accept him. Those three sentences pretty much sum up the entirety of this book, which had promise but fails to deliver in terms of creating three-dimensional characters. The first quarter of this novel consists of Priya, the main character, complaining about what a horrible person her mother is. The rest of the story gives her family similar treatment, reducing them to a collection of st [...]

    4. In reading The Mango Season, I was introduced to a country and culture that I knew nothing about. You are immediately drawn into the culture of India, and the values of Indian family life. It is Mango Season and Priya returns home to tell her parents of news she knows they won’t want to hear. She has become engaged to everything that they are against. Living in the United States, Priya meets an American man and falls in love. Returning home to face the sweltering summer heat, the mango harvest [...]

    5. Уул нь улс орнуудын ёс заншил, мэдлэгээ нэмэх үүднээс орон орны тухай ном унших санаатай. Яагаад ч юм Энэтхэгийн тухай ном арай их уншаад байх юм. Энэ ёстой хөөрхөн, хошин ном. Дунд сургуулиа төгсөөд Америкт боловсрол эзэмшихээр очоод, тэндээ ажиллаж, найз залуутай болж суур [...]

    6. The entire book takes place within a span of a few days (2-4), but is full of detail. The sights and sounds of India, even the smell and taste of mangoes, are abundantly described. It throws you right back to the Homeland.The story is about a woman who, having grown up in India, has lived in the U.S. for the past 7 seven years (school, then career) and finally goes back for the express purpose of telling her family that she is engaged to and wants to marry an American. O_OAmulya Malladi does a g [...]

    7. There are some books, which when once started are difficult to put down again. And lo behold, if you start reading such books late night. This happened to me yesterday. I started on Mango Season around 11 pm, reluctantly went to bed at 12.30, day dreamt about the characters while at work ( luckily or unluckily, today was a very busy day), read a bit more at lunch time, and finally finished it off at a stretch at around 9 pm today. My son had an inkling that I liked the book a bit too much, when [...]

    8. Priya is a woman born and raised in India, who for the past 7 years of her life has lived in the US while attending university and working. While there she falls in love and gets engaged to an American man, despite knowing her family would be completely devasted by that. Now, Priya travels back to India to spend a week with her family and inform them about her upcoming marriage. This is a cute and humorous novel, full of very 'senzorial' descriptions of India and Indian food. Here is my full vid [...]

    9. The story basically evolves around the indian tradition and how it is a must for girls to save their money for the purpose of dowry when they get married later in future. It was also about the orthodox people who were very cautious about their status as Brahmins and getting married to someone out of their caste was forbidden.

    10. Wow. This book.ially I didn't like the author's writing style or the flow of the story, but I stuck with it and I'm so glad I did. Slowly, the story about an Indian-born woman who returns home from America after seven years unfolds. Struggling to acclimate to her native land which she now sees through American eyes, Priya is thrust into talks of arranged marriage. The catch, however, is Priya has a fiance with whom she's lived for two yearsubeknownst to her family. So, it takes Priya more than h [...]

    11. What a horrible book. As a Pakistani woman, I'm always searching for a read with a great brown female protagonist who doesn't abandon her culture, or criticize the life that she once lived, or the customs that she no longer lives within. However, I have yet to find such a book. Some come closer than others but this was by far one of the most disappointing books I have ever read in my life. Not only does Priya spend more or less the ENTIRE book complaining about her mother and her family, but she [...]

    12. The story is about Priya, who comes from a strict Telugu Brahmin family & her struggles to convey to the family regarding her American boyfriend. It’s a fast and easy read. I shall add it’s mouth-watering too with a recipe at the end of each chapter, especially using mangoes which are my favourite fruit. It brings back sweet memories when reading The Mango Season, the fight between Priya & Nate for HAPPINESS reminds me the fight between my sister & I had for the same HAPPINESS, t [...]

    13. I read this book in 1 day, needless to say I enjoyed reading it. First of all I thought that the recipes before each chapter was a lovely idea to include, because it brought me into the world of the food-culture and made it easier to imagine the world as a realistic one. The characters were great, and most of all the description of the differences between the two cultures was what I liked the most. I didn't know much about the Indian culture before reading this, but now post-reading I find mysel [...]

    14. Such a nice read! I am not very familiar with the Indian culture and reading this book was eye-opening. Priya's story, her fear of telling her parents about her American fiancee by returning in India after 7 years in the US is full of flavor and humor. And the ending is sooooo good! Great story.

    15. I love India. I've been there several times, and written a book with my husband about some of our friends there. I loved this book because of the "insiders perspective" into an Indian family's life. People in the U.S.A. are usually very surprised when they find out that arranged marriages are still very common in India. There are many beneficial, successful marriages done this way, and many that are not. My favorite part of this book is where the author says, "India was not just a country you vi [...]

    16. If you had any doubt over whether or not every culture has dysfunctional families, this book will prove it.It was a sweet book, my only problems with it were:1) the author assumes that the reader has some understanding of Indian culture and phrases - if you're a person like me, with little to no understanding of it, there are some phrases and parts that can be a bit distracting.2) The formatting of the narrator's emails to her fiance, being in all caps, was kind of annoying.Other than that I lik [...]

    17. The plot is very familiar--a girl from a conservative Hyderabadi family goes to the US, falls in love with a foreigner, returns to convince her family to accept the match. There's nothing 'new' in the story. However, this book was really hard to put down (I finished it in a day). Food, particularly mango, forms a very important part of the narrative. There are many bits which are funny, and many which are frustrating. The language is simple and the story is cliched, but the narrative keeps you h [...]

    18. Nice story, emotional too i must say. I've never read books written by indian in particular, for these book it's Amulya Malladi. I'm still not quite sure if i like her way of writting, probably i need to explore more of her books soon. Even though for me the beginning of the story was abit boring but then it hit off with so much anticipation of what will happen next. For those who are foreign to indian culture might find this book informative and may raise eyebrows of how critical Indian can be [...]

    19. I enjoyed this quick read so much until the last pages when a small detail ruined it for mede it seem forced and unnatural. Too bad

    20. Priya's visit home let me into a culture I know little about. She was apprehensive to tell her parents that she was engaged to an American. And as I learned more about her and her family her apprehension turned into panic. She could lose her family for someone she loves because they didn't believe Indians should marry anyone but Indians. I thought the story was very interesting. I couldn't believe how racist the family was and how set in their traditional ways. I felt for Priya because she loved [...]

    21. I usually don’t read this type of book, but this year I’m trying to widen my horizon and India seemed an interesting destination. I wasn’t disappointed, this was a breath of fresh air.Priya is a young indian woman who lives in the US since some years and comes back to her home country because she needs to tell her family about her future wedding with an american man. She faces a difficult situation and tries to find her place as an adult, which is not an easy thing: she’s a strong woman [...]

    22. I have always wondered what made these NRIs make a show of marriage at home when they have a partner ducked away abroad and then a create a real hungama. Have heard so many stories like that. Had my answers in this book. It was a book of emotions and delicious food descriptions. Loved it very very much. Looking forward to read more from this author.

    23. Choque cultural y enfrentamientos familiares, pero todo bastante descafeinado. Se lee rápido y ya. Nada del otro mundo.

    24. I have found another favourite author. This is indeed a very nice story. Love, family values, food, and lots of humour made it special

    25. I like the book. I enjoyed that the book was more about asserting one's independence and the underlying suspense that held until the end. Good quick read.

    26. This is a book written for white people. What with the recipes and the exotic-sounding words.Priya (the protagonist) comes across as whiny, and prissy. Her entire family is boorish, and small-minded, and racist, except her. She's redeemed because she has seen the light by living in "the America" and being engaged to a white man.This is what I learned from this book.Indian mothers want their sons marry rich girls and get a handsome dowry, and their daughters to marry a boy of their choice. Marria [...]

    27. Depasirea obstacoleleor privind incalcarea traditiilor indiene pentru Prya se dovedeste a cu atat mai greu cu cat iubirea fata de familie este mai mare.Dar dragostea pentru Nick o face puternica in fata barierelor culturale intre generatii.Cartea te captiveaza prin informatiile culturale si gastronomice ale Indiei.

    28. A quick little thing about a woman returning home after seven years away. She has fallen in love with an American and is engaged to be married and has to break this to her super traditional family.I enjoyed the premise of this a lot, though the heavy info and history dumps really broke the story itself up in a way that really made it hard to stay connected.

    29. Taking place within a span of about 3 days, this book flows well. It keeps the reader captured as one wonders whether or not the protagonist is going to spill the beans about her American boyfriend to her parents, whom she's visiting in India. As an expatriate who visits the country every now and then, I could relate a lot to Priya's experiences. The sense that so much is the same and yet how much has changed Also the way the people back home hold the same opinions like before, but now you look [...]

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