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The Slave Girl

The Slave Girl The Slave Girl follows the fortunes of Ogbanje Ojebeta a Nigerian woman who is sold into slavery in her own land after disease and tragedy leave her orphaned as a child In her fellow slaves she find

  • Title: The Slave Girl
  • Author: Buchi Emecheta
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 373
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Slave Girl follows the fortunes of Ogbanje Ojebeta, a Nigerian woman who is sold into slavery in her own land after disease and tragedy leave her orphaned as a child In her fellow slaves, she finds a surrogate family that clings together under the unbending will of their master As Ogbanje Ojebeta becomes a woman and discovers her need for home and family, and for freThe Slave Girl follows the fortunes of Ogbanje Ojebeta, a Nigerian woman who is sold into slavery in her own land after disease and tragedy leave her orphaned as a child In her fellow slaves, she finds a surrogate family that clings together under the unbending will of their master As Ogbanje Ojebeta becomes a woman and discovers her need for home and family, and for freedom and identity, she realizes that she must ultimately choose her own destiny.

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      373 Buchi Emecheta
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      Posted by:Buchi Emecheta
      Published :2018-04-26T13:34:31+00:00

    1 thought on “The Slave Girl

    1. Buchi Emecheta never fails to transport me to another world, a familiar West African world, through her pointed dialogue and scintillating storytelling. Like Chinua Achebe, she has the gift of moving story forward through intentional dialogue, something not too many novels do well. Along I went for the ride, transported by dialect and regional syntax, and I think this is the beauty of most fiction written with an African atmospheric slant - this has unapologetic, cultural nuance. I may have been [...]

    2. Why had I never heard of this author? I'm really quite surprised about that. But thankful my Africa group selected her as the feature author this month during our year-long exploration of Nigerian literature. Emecheta writes beautifully and explains cultural and historical things without explaining. This particular book takes place in the early twentieth century when Britain is consolidating its hold on its Nigerian colony. We see some of the effects of this on various groups of people but the s [...]

    3. So sorry this has taken me so long to read this brilliant writer. I'm going to be definitely reading more of her work. Worse, is my sadness of not connecting with her before her death earlier this year. She writes from an African perspective of a child being sold into slavery by her brother and returning years later to her village. Emecheta has an smooth and flowing writing style that is so easy to become involved in, and easy to stay with. She accomplishes so much more than a story about slaver [...]

    4. This novel offers a more accurate narrative of African Identity. It charts the journey of a young girl from slavery to freedom, but more importantly it refutes a Western Fairytale ending. Instead the novel inserts its reader into the Igbo way of thinking and living, and their terms of a happy ending I enjoyed this novel tremendously It is a good read

    5. I did NOT like the way this book ended. Buchi Emecheta tends to end stories too quickly for me, but this one was a little more developed towards the end. However, I did not like the ending to this story. It was if no morsel of wisdom was gained.

    6. This is a vivid and beautifully rendered account of both colonial Africa and the female experience. We learn that poor treatment transcends the boundaries of black and white, and that everyone can come together in the exploitation and commoditization of women. Filled with startling parallels. Don't take the advice of the guy who gave it one star. It's about the mistreatment of WOMEN, which is necessarily something he could (personally) know nothing about. This is a BRILLIANT book.

    7. What a wonderful book! I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and want to ready more by Emecheta. . Beautifully crafted characters and spare but descriptive narrative. A woman's life story from birth, through her parent's death, to her brother selling into slavery. Especially enjoyed the narrative of her brother's justification of why he was selling his sister. Five Stars!

    8. the slave girl by buchi emecheta african literature that deals with one of the most disputable topics: slave labour however when related to familar bonds it exceeds beyond all cruelties.i found myself shedding tears here, and smiling out of joy there literally living with ojebeta. A reader finds himself struggling with some expressions: "sold to be given a chance to live " is the most brutally ironic one which happens to be memorised. Ojebeta's last words about the new owner seem to illustrate M [...]

    9. 2015 Reading Challenge - A book that came out the year you were born.This book was really good. It was one of those books that had me staying up way past my bedtime, because I wanted to know what was going to happen next. How as Ojebeta's life going to unfold. Would she get her freedom, would she return to her home, would her brother have remorse, etc. etc. etc. The writing was engaging and smooth. I could see the pictures unfold in front of me and imagine myself in her village, at the Otu Onits [...]

    10. In the aftermath of the influenza epidemic that wiped out so many people in her community, including both of her parents, seven-year-old Ogbanje Ojebeta was sold to a distant relative for £8, to live and work as a slave. The novel follows her through the nine years she spent in that role, to her time back in Ibuza, and to adulthood and her new position as wife and mother in Lagos.

    11. Emecheta really does a remarkable job of showing us what it is like to be an African woman today, struggling to meld past and present. To follow some age old customs, but to also be allowed to embrace new world ideas.

    12. I really enjoyed The Slave Girl. In fact, I like Buchi Emecheta's down-to-earth, funny and natural style. Her stories are vivid and she provides her reader with in-depth understanding of Nigeria culture.

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