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Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings

Academic Conversations Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings Where would we be without conversation Throughout history conversations have allowed us to see different perspectives build ideas and solve problems Conversations particularly those referred to in

  • Title: Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings
  • Author: Jeff Zwiers Marie Crawford
  • ISBN: 9781571108845
  • Page: 247
  • Format: Paperback
  • Where would we be without conversation Throughout history, conversations have allowed us to see different perspectives, build ideas, and solve problems Conversations, particularly those referred to in this book as academic conversations, push students to think and learn in lasting ways Academic conversations are back and forth dialogues in which students focus on a topiWhere would we be without conversation Throughout history, conversations have allowed us to see different perspectives, build ideas, and solve problems Conversations, particularly those referred to in this book as academic conversations, push students to think and learn in lasting ways Academic conversations are back and forth dialogues in which students focus on a topic and explore it by building, challenging, and negotiating relevant ideas.Unfortunately, academic conversations are rare in many classrooms Talk is often dominated by the teacher and a few students, or it does not advance beyond short responses to the teacher s questions Even certain teaching approaches and curriculum programs neglect to train students how to maintain a focused, respectful, and thoughtful conversation.To address these challenges, authors Jeff Zwiers and Marie Crawford have identified five core communication skills to help students hold productive academic conversations across content areas These skills include elaborating and clarifying, supporting ideas with evidence, building on and or challenging ideas, paraphrasing, and synthesizing This book shows teachers how to weave the cultivation of academic conversation skills and conversations into current teaching approaches More specifically, it describes how to use conversations to build the following Academic vocabulary and grammar Critical thinking skills such as persuasion, interpretation, consideration of multiple perspectives, evaluation, and application Literacy skills such as questioning, predicting, connecting to prior knowledge, and summarizing Complex and abstract essential understandings in content areas such as adaptation, human nature, bias, conservation of mass, energy, gravity, irony, democracy, greed, and An academic classroom environment brimming with respect for others ideas, equity of voice, engagement, and mutual supportThe ideas in this book stem from many hours of classroom practice, research, and video analysis across grade levels and content areas Readers will find numerous practical activities for working on each conversation skill, crafting conversation worthy tasks, and using conversations to teach and assess Academic Conversations offers an in depth approach to helping students develop into the future parents, teachers, and leaders who will collaborate to build a better world.

    • ✓ Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Jeff Zwiers Marie Crawford
      247 Jeff Zwiers Marie Crawford
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Jeff Zwiers Marie Crawford
      Posted by:Jeff Zwiers Marie Crawford
      Published :2018-08-20T11:35:16+00:00

    1 thought on “Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings

    1. Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings by Jeff Zwiers is built on the idea that some of the best learning that occurs for all of us happens in conversations and that a powerful way to improve student learning and increase transfer skills across curriculum (and into life) is through teaching the skills involved in engaging in conversations about content areas. These conversations won't just happen and author Jeff Zwiers offers many strateg [...]

    2. This book is helpful but it was a tedious read. It could have been about fifty or so pages shorter. The first two chapters focus on convincing the reader on why Academic Discourse and conversations are good for students. But instead of feeling like it's setting a pedagogical framework for the rest of the chapters, it just feels like the writer's preaching to the choir. Those two chapters are composed of a list of arguments that briefly outline the benefits of academic discourse. The whole time y [...]

    3. Don't you just love irony? Our students talk, talk, talk -- sometimes to the point where teachers are begging them to keep quiet so they can get on already with the lesson. There's the rub (and also the irony), as our old friend the Bard would say. Teachers could actually be channeling that energy by teaching something called "conversational skills" -- the kind used for academic (and later, career) purposes. Hmn. Now there's a thought. What if talk is the lesson. Academic talk instead of blah, b [...]

    4. For all the practical ideas it boasts, Academic Conversations is a highly philosophical text. Had I stumbled upon this book ten years ago, I doubt I would have been able to translate Jeff Zwiers & Marie Crawford's ideas into tangible magic in the classroom. But no worries for me now, considering that this book has fallen into my hands at this stage in my teaching (my 13th year). This book is a powerful challenge to pump up my student conversations--particularly those with students who are no [...]

    5. I've had this book for a few years because I've always had some difficulty making class discussion work well. After some feedback reinforcing that from my students this year, I decided to include Zwiers & Crawford in my summer reading.Overall, the book was good, but the focus is more on paired conversation than on group discussion. I agree with the authors that paired conversation is an important activity to have your students master, and it can certainly be applied to small-group and/or pro [...]

    6. Book #39 of 2016.Zwiers and Crawford weave philosophy, research, anecdotes, and activities together for a text that is fully accessible. The bottom line is that students are often most engaged when they are conversing, and engagement leads to better learning. This book backs this up with various studies and personal examples. It provides useful rubrics and graphic organizers. I loved that it has a chapter devoted to three different disciplines (literature, history, and science) as well as an ent [...]

    7. So far it's interesting. I would love, however, to do this as a book study; it's so frustrating trying to implement this into just my classroom when I know it's best practice.

    8. Then irony of how we operate our classrooms is that we generally spend a lot of time trying to get our students quiet. I see a lot of teachers playing the educational equivalent of “Whack-a-mole” while they desperately try to teach or engage students in work. The reality is that our students seriously lack communication skills in multiple levels. This presents itself in many ways, including low literacy levels, disruptive school behaviors, and a disengagement in face to face interactions. Ou [...]

    9. Lots of practical ideas of how to bring more productive talk back into your classroom. Rubrics are included so students know the expectations of what academic talk should sound like. Ideas for posters to keep the conversation going. I also found the chapter on grammar and vocabulary affirming- this is something that I have known was so important , but I've often put on the back burner. This book changed how I will teach in the fall. I wrote noes all over it- it won't be sitting on a shelf!

    10. Zwiers and Crawford reinforce that crazy notion: Let them talk. Require them to think. :) As an educator who models/teaches, nurtures, and requires meaningful thinking and conversing in my classroom, I find this book a useful tool for those who would like to increase this practice in their own classrooms. It's interesting how often teachers will say: "This will never work. Kids can't focus and discuss. There will be dozens of discipline issues." It's our job to model, to practice with them, to b [...]

    11. This book contains a wealth of great tips and information about questioning techniques for the classroom. The primary focus of the book is encouraging students to use more academic language, and designing lessons that are more student-centered. Students are encouraged to question each other and drive the lessons. Questioning prompt and responses are outlined, and many tables and charts are interspersed. I read the Kindle version and I recommend the hard copy, as some of the most useful content w [...]

    12. What I enjoyed most about this book is the fact that it combined examples that I could see in the classroom in with the text. I love the Conversations about History section, as a lover of history, despite not teaching that subject specifically. I was able to see things I was doing in the class already (what a relief!), as well as great next steps. There were so many amazing ideas about to foster academic conversations and to assess them. I only wish there was a version for very young school-age [...]

    13. This is a great book on how to encourage critical thinking in your classroom through conversations. It provides a lot of practical advice and ideas for activities. I also really liked that it covered different disciplines: language arts, history, and science. This really gives a good picture of how critical thinking can be applied across different courses, but also how it can be approached in distinct ways.

    14. This book is stuffed with new ideas and activities. You could easily use it as the textbook for an education course, incorporating the conversations in your teaching bit by bit. No doubt it can yield great results, but it is a little overwhelming to think of the amount of coaching and modeling it would require to approach the sample student conversations found here. I plan on referring to this as a resource in my ELD and Spanish classes from now on.

    15. If you want to start academic conversations in your class and you don't know where to start this is the book for you if you are in grades 6 or above. It discusses structure of conversation, how to get it started in your classroom, how to have your students organize their conversations better. I would be hard-pressed to apply much of it specifically to elementary. In broad general strokes, sure, but in the details, I didn't find much application.

    16. Brilliantly simple, effective ideas and concrete plans for putting the theory into action. I'm definitely revamping my units to center around conversation. It's write obvious that kids (especially the middle school kiddos I teach) don't listen to anyone but their peers. Let's try working with this instead of trying to force them out of what is most natural to their brains.

    17. A bit tedious with all the various activities listed, but really, they will come in handy. I will be weaving in ideas and activities from this book into my class. While my class has always been about conversation, this brings conversing to a whole new level-one I know we should get our students to.

    18. This helped bring about good conversations among some of the staff at my building, but ultimately was less practical for elementary. If we were teaching at the secondary level, I think I might have rated a 4

    19. Really love this topic and of course the way Zwiers explains it with feasible examples. This is a must-read for classrooms of all ages; really helps you rethink what our instruction looks like and how it could be so much more impactful.

    20. Well. Clearly, I have a lot of work to do to improve academic conversations in my classroom. I'm trying!

    21. Not a bad way to start thinking about getting conversations into the classroom. I liked how they broke things down by content area. Unfortunately, they left out math conversations.

    22. "Conversations change the game of learningIf students are to be lifelong independent learners and thinkers, they must be able to learn through conversation."

    23. A good overview of some useful ideas for using more discussion in any classroom across contents. Not much more than that.

    24. A lot of fantastic ideas to help develop speaking and thinking skills for students. This would have been a 5, but all of the History ideas I already knew being an avid follower of Sam Wineberg.

    25. Excellent resource! It would make a wonderful resource. It covers strategize and methods for school/district-wide application. Highly recommend it.

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