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Stranded: Rock and Roll for a Desert Island

Stranded Rock and Roll for a Desert Island In Greil Marcus asked twenty writers on rock including Dave Marsh Lester Bangs Nick Tosches Ellen Willis and Robert Christgau a question What one rock and roll album would you take to a dese

  • Title: Stranded: Rock and Roll for a Desert Island
  • Author: Greil Marcus Robert Christgau
  • ISBN: 9780306815324
  • Page: 270
  • Format: Paperback
  • In 1978, Greil Marcus asked twenty writers on rock including Dave Marsh, Lester Bangs, Nick Tosches, Ellen Willis, and Robert Christgau a question What one rock and roll album would you take to a desert island The resulting essays were collected in Stranded, twenty passionate declarations to such albums as The Rolling Stones Beggars Banquet, the Ramones Rocket to RussiIn 1978, Greil Marcus asked twenty writers on rock including Dave Marsh, Lester Bangs, Nick Tosches, Ellen Willis, and Robert Christgau a question What one rock and roll album would you take to a desert island The resulting essays were collected in Stranded, twenty passionate declarations to such albums as The Rolling Stones Beggars Banquet, the Ramones Rocket to Russia, Something Else by the Kinks, and Universally revered as the ur text of rock journalism, Stranded is an indispensable classic.

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      Published :2018-08-11T01:43:25+00:00

    1 thought on “Stranded: Rock and Roll for a Desert Island

    1. It's a simple but brilliant idea for a book. Greil Marcus asked a number of the top music writers to pick one album that he or she would take to a desert island and write a little piece on it. The result is this compelling collection. It would be churlish to argue right off with the selections (What? No Blonde on Blonde? No White Album?)because these essays are almost all beautifully written even when they are about artists you don't care about (for me, The Eagles, and The New York Dolls) and so [...]

    2. got this for the lester bangs essay on astral weeks:"But in the condition I was in, it assumed at the time the quality of a beacon, a light on the far shores of the murk; what's more, it was proof that there was something left to express artistically besides nihilism and destruction. It sounded like the man who made Astral Weeks was in terrible pain, pain most of Van Morrison's previous works had only suggested; but like the later albums by the Velvet Underground, there was a redemptive element [...]

    3. A lifetime in publishing and bookselling combined with the limited space of a city apartment-dweller means that I am forced to get rid of most of the thousands of books that have passed through my hands and mind, the exceptions being volumes that somehow have accumulated totemic emotional importance. Somewhere in my parents' house is a battered copy of the 1979 Knopf paperback edition of Stranded: Rock and Roll for a Desert Island, in which Rolling Stone writer Greil Marcus asks a Murderer's Row [...]

    4. Having just joined earlier this month I’ve been adding books to my “read” shelf as I recall them. The list is at about 385 books as of today though that number is only a fraction of what I’ve read in my life. Perusing my bookshelves the other day in order to add to the list I came across this book, which I bought when it was first released back in 1979 and I was 21 years old. The book consists of twenty rock and roll writers essays answering the question: what rock and roll record would [...]

    5. The last time I read this was six years ago, making my way across England in trains and buses, and that was a pretty interesting reading experience, considering this is such an Americentric book. A couple Stones albums, a couple Van Morrisons, and a Kinks record represent the entirety of the UK contingent, but you'll hear no quibbles from me.Anyway, I came back to this off and on for well over a month and then bulldozed through the last two thirds of it in the past few days, and I'm surprised at [...]

    6. I'm not gonna lie; I'm not sure I've read this book. What I HAVE read, which I know this book contains, is Lester Bangs' review of Astral Weeks, which pretty much sums up how I feel about Astral Weeks, which is that it changed my life forever. Do yourself a favor and read the review (you can find it free all over the interweb), and then read the other collections of Bangs' material. Or skip all that and just listen to Astral Weeks.

    7. A grab bag by nature, but there are unmissable essays here from Nick Tosches, Lester Bangs, Ellen Willis, Simon Frith, and Ed Ward. And damn good ones from Robert Christgau, Tom Carson, M. Mark, Dave Marsh, and Langdon Winner. Only a few duds overall and they're mercifully brief. Best of all is Greil Marcus's "Treasure Island" discography which ends the book. It's pithy and insightful selection of essential rock and R&B and has led me to many wonderful albums and songs I had somehow overlook [...]

    8. “He triggers memories like you were a jukebox and he was the man with all the quarters.”This quote comes from an amazing book that I have just rediscovered…Stranded: Rock & Roll for a Desert Island by Greil Marcus.Sometime in the 70′s, Marcus decided that it would be really cool to ask music critics and performers what music they would absolutely have to have if they were stranded on a desert island. This book is a compilation of those answers, and it contains some brilliant essays o [...]

    9. Re-reading this book tonight, I had to admit that a number of the essays capture the sincerity and seriously loony juvenile excitement of rock writing at its best. I like that Greil Marcus treats the "Discography" at the book's close as an occasion for self-parody, and fantasy, as well as real criticism: "Dylan's tone [in Blonde on Blonde] is sardonic, scared, threatening, as if he'd been awakened after paying all his debts to find that nothing was settled." That's brilliant, and I assume it's s [...]

    10. I guess at this point Stranded is worth reading as much for historical curiosity as anything else Yes, Bangs' essay on Astral Weeks is just as good as it's reputed to be (better, maybe), but most of the rest of this collection is more interesting for the snapshot of the aesthetic mores and debates of the time than it's able to move or convince you. It's an interesting idea for a book, and one students of pop culture, rock music, or criticism ought to find worth their time, but not exactly deathl [...]

    11. This is the book that got me into rock n roll journalism four years ago. A lot of writers contribute impassioned entries on what album they would take to a desert island and why. The prose alone will get you high, but it's the fire in their bellies that will make you remember Stranded as a book to hold onto for a long time.

    12. Another scary book of music criticism. You'll read it, and suddenly find yourself reassessing all those Elton John records in the store. Was the review right? Would this be the record for you on a desert island? Very interesting, and makes for a more rounded discussion than the usual critic fav, 'Top xx Songs of All-Time.'

    13. This was a good book. That's all you need to know. My favorite review was for 'Rocket To Russia' by the Ramones. I found it on vacation in a little discount bookstore, and I promise you,you won't be disappointed. The only thing I didn't like was the Linda Ronstandt review, which just went on forever on her vocal range, which was bit to boring for me.Still, find this book. Good stuff.

    14. Great concept - the records you'd want to be stranded on a desert island with - but despite the great writers, most of the choices reflect a generational gap that left me uninspired. I recommend Our Band Could Be Your Life instead.

    15. I read this book when I was a senior in high school. I remember it only because it got me interested in Van Morrison's "Astral Weeks", one of my all-time favorite albums"Step right up, and step right up, and step right up, just like a ballerina."

    16. That's the average and it is partially boosted by the fact that the Lester Bangs essay on Astral Weeks gets six stars.

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