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Having a Good Cry: Effeminate Feelings and Pop-Culture Forms

Having a Good Cry Effeminate Feelings and Pop Culture Forms Warhol English U of Vermont examines the ways in which various effeminate varieties of th and th century fiction use formulas to produce certain responses such as crying among their fans Taking a

  • Title: Having a Good Cry: Effeminate Feelings and Pop-Culture Forms
  • Author: Robyn R. Warhol
  • ISBN: 9780814251089
  • Page: 462
  • Format: Paperback
  • Warhol English, U of Vermont examines the ways in which various effeminate varieties of 19th and 20th century fiction use formulas to produce certain responses such as crying among their fans Taking a psycho physiological approach, the author seeks to describe the somatic experience of reading as it takes place in the gendered body Some of the genres studied hereWarhol English, U of Vermont examines the ways in which various effeminate varieties of 19th and 20th century fiction use formulas to produce certain responses such as crying among their fans Taking a psycho physiological approach, the author seeks to describe the somatic experience of reading as it takes place in the gendered body Some of the genres studied here include sentimental stories, marriage plots, serialized novels, and soap operas Annotation 2003 Book News, Inc Portland, OR

    • Best Download [Robyn R. Warhol] Ù Having a Good Cry: Effeminate Feelings and Pop-Culture Forms || [Spirituality Book] PDF ☆
      462 Robyn R. Warhol
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      Posted by:Robyn R. Warhol
      Published :2018-012-18T16:27:32+00:00

    1 thought on “Having a Good Cry: Effeminate Feelings and Pop-Culture Forms

    1. Robyn Warhol attempts to conceive of how reading feels in the body. She forwards a performative theory of reading emotion in which we do not have real and fake feelings (modernist theory of interiority) but in which the physical act itself constitutes the emotion. Concentrates on 19th and 20th century serial pop culture forms. Trollope and Palliser novels.

    2. Well, for what I'm interested in academically/dissertationally, this isn't my bag. However, it is super interesting and well written, so I enjoyed it. (My nerd status is becoming cemented, isn't it?) Robyn--yes, I know her, too; she looks sort of like an older, funky academic version of Meryl Streep in The Devil Wears Prada--does feminist narratology (long story), so this text, like her others, is concerned with issues of that nature. Her main argument goes something like this: reading is a phys [...]

    3. Loved this even more the second time around. It's a little clunky in some places and I don't think it pursues the implications of its arguments as far as it could. But it seems so useful (especially for thinking about fandom and pop culture) and it was really fun to read.

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