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Chronic Condition: Why Canada's Health Care System Needs To Be Dragged Into The 21c

Chronic Condition Why Canada s Health Care System Needs To Be Dragged Into The c Medicare is the third rail of Canadian politics Touch it and you die Every politician knows this truism which is why no one wants to debate it Privately many of them understand that the health care

  • Title: Chronic Condition: Why Canada's Health Care System Needs To Be Dragged Into The 21c
  • Author: Jeffrey Simpson
  • ISBN: 9780670065899
  • Page: 340
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Medicare is the third rail of Canadian politics Touch it and you die Every politician knows this truism, which is why no one wants to debate it Privately, many of them understand that the health care system, which costs about 200 billion a year in public and private money, cannot continue as it is increasingly ill adapted to an aging population with public costs growinMedicare is the third rail of Canadian politics Touch it and you die Every politician knows this truism, which is why no one wants to debate it Privately, many of them understand that the health care system, which costs about 200 billion a year in public and private money, cannot continue as it is increasingly ill adapted to an aging population with public costs growing faster than government revenues In Chronic Condition, Jeffrey Simpson meets health care head on and explores the only four options we have to end this growing crisis cuts in spending, tax increases, privatization, and reaping savings through increased efficiency He examines the tenets of the Medicare system that Canadians cling to so passionately Here, he finds that many other countries have extensive public health systems, and Canadian health care produces only average value for money In fact, our rigid system for some health care needs and a costly system for other needs drugs, dentistry, and home care is really the worst of both worlds Chronic Condition breaks the silence about the huge changes and real choices that Canadians face.

    • ☆ Chronic Condition: Why Canada's Health Care System Needs To Be Dragged Into The 21c || ↠ PDF Download by ✓ Jeffrey Simpson
      340 Jeffrey Simpson
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Chronic Condition: Why Canada's Health Care System Needs To Be Dragged Into The 21c || ↠ PDF Download by ✓ Jeffrey Simpson
      Posted by:Jeffrey Simpson
      Published :2018-08-03T12:04:48+00:00

    1 thought on “Chronic Condition: Why Canada's Health Care System Needs To Be Dragged Into The 21c

    1. Seriously disappointing. For someone who spends a lot time and effort complaining that health care system reform is hampered by politicians, providers and a public with no vision Simpson shows a real lack of it. In his world the system starts and pretty much stops at the hospital doors. His 'solutions' are simplistic, poorly thought out and limited in scope. He spends a lot of time talking about private options for joint replacement surgery; like politicians he focuses on high profile surgery. N [...]

    2. An informative read, this book will no doubt have it's avid supporters and others who feel passionately that it's on the wrong track.The first half of the book, which outlines the birth of Medicare in Canada, was the most interesting. Born in the midst of the great Depression, health care as envisioned by the pioneers of Medicare was initially a two-tiered system - the rich paid while the poor had their costs covered. Rather ironic considering all the controversy today around private vs publicly [...]

    3. There information in this book that I agree with and heartily endorse but there were some parts of the book ton which Mr Simpson missed the boat completely.I agree that our health care system is in decline because of greed,lack of centralization and overwhelmingly top heavy chapter was devoted to the failure of doctors and nurses in the system.Poor research or research with only one group [the Doctors] leaves you with one point of referenceThe Doctors. Not did I agree that nurse practitioners co [...]

    4. Canadians feel strongly about our healthcare system; yet many of us seem unwilling to face the reality that our healthcare costs are increasing at an unsustainable rate. Geoffrey Simpson provides a useful history of how our system developed and takes a tough look at some of the problems and challenges confronting us. I admire the strong case he makes for the potential improvement offered by publicly-funded services being provided by private health care deliverers. He argues that this possibility [...]

    5. A difficult read not because of its complexity but simply because its boring and repetitive. To give him credit, Simpson does a good job of relating the origin of medicare in Canada. However, he becomes very repetitive in discussing the "touchstone" nature of the Canada Health Act and how we need to become more flexible. He is very critical of the amount money spent yet when discussing spending and savings he refuses to acknowledge the American experience saying Canadians are far too focused on [...]

    6. This was required reading for my job and although I treated it as a book to be skimmed, I did find myself stopping and rereading some passages that really struck the chord of my experience with the health care system. The thesis is easy, our health care system is old and it needs to modernize to meet the needs of a changing world. What is so much more difficult, is what that looks like for public policy makers. Some easy wins - doctors and nurses earn less; more focus on services delivered outsi [...]

    7. This book was helpful because it gave an informed critique of all aspects of Canada's medical system. For instance, universal healthcare really isn't universal. It mainly focuses on doctor's salaries and hospital administration. That's where most of the money goes. Other areas such as pharmaceuticals, dentistry, and optometry, to name some, are not covered. Canada's healthcare system is not the best in the world. The author calls it a Chevrolet system with Cadillac prices. Wait times are not sol [...]

    8. I found this book a little slow to get started. I realize the importance of the history of the Canadian health care system for context. But the back and forth debates for the first 150 pages was too much. After that it got into the details of the limitations and improvements that could be made which was much more interesting to me. As a whole I would recommend but may suggest skipping the first 150 if history of healthcare isn't your thing.

    9. It seems like a well researched enough book. But any book that I get a quarter of the way into and am still not interested has failed me. Moving onto the next one.

    10. Well researched, but a bit of a slow read. I do not always agree with mr. Simpson, but at least he has "facts" to back up his opinion.

    11. Great overview of the Canadian Health care system. Knowing that it has traditionally taken 30-40 years of repetition for all all major health care changes to actually take hold explains a lot.

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