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Coming Up Short: Working-Class Adulthood in an Age of Uncertainty

Coming Up Short Working Class Adulthood in an Age of Uncertainty What does it mean to grow up today as working class young adults How does the economic and social instability left in the wake of neoliberalism shape their identities their understandings of the Amer

  • Title: Coming Up Short: Working-Class Adulthood in an Age of Uncertainty
  • Author: Jennifer M. Silva
  • ISBN: 9780199931460
  • Page: 182
  • Format: Hardcover
  • What does it mean to grow up today as working class young adults How does the economic and social instability left in the wake of neoliberalism shape their identities, their understandings of the American Dream, and their futures Coming Up Short illuminates the transition to adulthood for working class men and women Moving away from easy labels such as the Peter Pan geWhat does it mean to grow up today as working class young adults How does the economic and social instability left in the wake of neoliberalism shape their identities, their understandings of the American Dream, and their futures Coming Up Short illuminates the transition to adulthood for working class men and women Moving away from easy labels such as the Peter Pan generation, Jennifer Silva reveals the far bleaker picture of how the erosion of traditional markers of adulthood marriage, a steady job, a house of one s own has changed what it means to grow up as part of the post industrial working class Based on one hundred interviews with working class people in two towns Lowell, Massachusetts, and Richmond, Virginia Silva sheds light on their experience of heightened economic insecurity, deepening inequality, and uncertainty about marriage and family Silva argues that, for these men and women, coming of age means coming to terms with the absence of choice As possibilities and hope contract, moving into adulthood has been re defined as a process of personal struggle an adult is no longer someone with a small home and a reliable car, but someone who has faced and overcome personal demons to reconstruct a transformed self Indeed, rather than turn to politics to restore the traditional working class, this generation builds meaning and dignity through the struggle to exorcise the demons of familial abuse, mental health problems, addiction, or betrayal in past relationships This dramatic and largely unnoticed shift reduces becoming an adult to solitary suffering, self blame, and an endless seeking for signs of progress This powerfully written book focuses on those who are most vulnerable young, working class people, including African Americans, women, and single parents and reveals what, in very real terms, the demise of the social safety net means to their fragile hold on the American Dream.

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      182 Jennifer M. Silva
    • thumbnail Title: Ë Coming Up Short: Working-Class Adulthood in an Age of Uncertainty || ↠ PDF Download by ✓ Jennifer M. Silva
      Posted by:Jennifer M. Silva
      Published :2018-07-07T16:27:01+00:00

    1 thought on “Coming Up Short: Working-Class Adulthood in an Age of Uncertainty

    1. This is the book version of Silva's recent sociology dissertation at Virginia. Her study examines the experiences of 100 working class young adults as they attempt to engage with the US economy in the years after the financial crisis of 2008. The methodology appears to be qualitative - interviews based on an interview protocol. The statistics seem basic here.Silva has a number of really interesting findings that all focus on the "coming of age" stories of the participants. The basic result that [...]

    2. A fascinating exploration of young working-class adults and what it means to come of age in today's society. One of the central themes is that traditional markers of adulthood such as education, employment, marriage, and children have been replaced with individual narratives that each person must explore and define, often without institutions helping to get the knowledge, skills, credentials, or money to better themselves. This self-reliance is set against a society that is shifting risk away fr [...]

    3. If all Jennifer Silva did was write a well-researched very readable academic work that would be enough to celebrate her book, but she's done much more than that. Coming up Short is both insightful and heartbreaking. The book draws on economics, sociology, demographics, and psychology to explore the decision-making and inner lives of young adults in an American economy where class mobility is limited and risk has been shifted from society to the individual. There are plenty of news articles that [...]

    4. Silva uses interviews to build a compelling argument about the changes to the markers of adulthood for young working class Americans. Career instability and he difficulty of getting a solid foothold on the old markets of progress have altered people's goals and what they think is possible. Silva writes well - this is a good read as an academic text and for a broader audience.

    5. Read for Sociology class, and was intrigued by the subject of the book. What does it mean to become in a adult in our age, especially for those part of the working class? Explains in detail also the nature of individualism in the States, and why people have lost trust in government/public institutions that theoretically could provide social support to those who are not so well of.

    6. I was pretty moved by this book. Although I'm just a hair under the target of the in-depth ethnographic study that the author performed, it was very moving for me to see the situation that many people similar to myself are in, and the amount of sympathy I felt ws sometimes overwhelming. If you're used to scholastic style writing and have a sociological bent I'd highly recommend this book.

    7. Coming Up Short is a compelling documentation of the many struggles young members of the working class face today in attempting to achieve the normative markers of adulthood. As Silva ably demonstrates, for a number of interrelated economic and cultural reasons, they simply cannot become "adults" in the traditional sense. To me the only drawbacks of the book were 1) its lack of coherent organization, where the author unnecessarily made the same arguments repeatedly, and 2) its overemphasis on em [...]

    8. Jennifer Silva's 'Coming Up Short' is a book that *ought* to have been written—all too often in this country is the subject of income inequality broached from the much more politically safe parlance of the "Middle Class", a term certainly more loaded with Americanisms that you can shake a stick at.I think talking about class in America is a little tricky. Rather, Capitalism is a system fueled by the fire of its losers rather than the so-called 'genius' of its winners—'Coming Up Short' is a b [...]

    9. Jennifer Silva's 'Coming Up Short' is a book that *ought* to have been written—all too often in this country is the subject of income inequality broached from the much more politically safe parlance of the "Middle Class", a term certainly more loaded with Americanisms that you can shake a stick at.I think talking about class in America is a little tricky. Rather, Capitalism is a system fueled by the fire of its losers rather than the so-called 'genius' of its winners—'Coming Up Short' is a b [...]

    10. First, an upsetting statistic I learned from this book:"Since the 1970s, marital dissolution rates have fallen dramatically among highly educated men and women but remained steady among those with lower education such that women with a four-year college degree are half as likely as other women to experience marital dissolution in the first ten years of a marriage."Some key ideas I took away from this book:"Ideology produces subjects who experience their subjugation as natural, inevitable, and fr [...]

    11. Not long before I picked up this book, I said to a friend over the phone, "Sometimes I feel like I'm failing at adulthood. All those checkboxes: school, job, house, car, marriage, kidsI feel like I can check only two or three. I feel like I'm behind somehow." Sadly, these sentiments are not unique. They are familiar to many guys and girls my age - we so-called "millenials." On the one hand, we are shadowed by our parents' definitions of adulthood, and on the other, we must come to terms with our [...]

    12. An amazing book as Silva shared the experiences of young working class people coming of age in this neo-liberal era. As a baby boomer, the study was eye opening in the terrain young people have to navigate with little support. While higher education secured my future, not only does it fail many of the people here, but they go into huge debt. I realize from the outside that young people face a crazy web of service jobs, but Silva really communicates the costs of this rise of service work and the [...]

    13. 100 snippets of real, working class, young adulthood, across the US eastern seaboard during the early 20-teens.Initially, this book reads like an academic research paper (which I guess it is), but the meat of this sociological research project comes out in the stories and confessions of young adults.All of the participants are basically asked the same simple question - what does reaching adulthood mean to you?

    14. Actual rating 2.5Out of all the books for class this was most likely the best one. The writing is very fluid and easy to understand. The author tries very hard to paint the proper picture of the loss of adulthood through the interviewees eyes. The book is pretty educational and an eye opener for different ideas of risk and livelihood. In the end I didn't hate this book but I can't say that I liked it either so somewhere I between.

    15. I found the author's general thesis, that milennials inhabit a, "mood economy," inaccurate and grating. That it was constantly reiterated made the book seem awkward and the analysis more literary in scope than economic.

    16. Excellent observations though her conclusions are weak. The terms "neoliberal" and "inequality" generate more heat than light.

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