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The Clockwork Man

The Clockwork Man Several thousand years from now advanced humanoids known as the Makers will implant clockwork devices into our heads At the cost of a certain amount of agency these devices will permit us to move un

  • Title: The Clockwork Man
  • Author: E.V. Odle Annalee Newitz Joshua Glenn
  • ISBN: 9781935869634
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Paperback
  • Several thousand years from now, advanced humanoids known as the Makers will implant clockwork devices into our heads At the cost of a certain amount of agency, these devices will permit us to move unhindered through time and space, and to live complacent, well regulated lives However, when one of these devices goes awry, a clockwork man appears accidentally in the 192Several thousand years from now, advanced humanoids known as the Makers will implant clockwork devices into our heads At the cost of a certain amount of agency, these devices will permit us to move unhindered through time and space, and to live complacent, well regulated lives However, when one of these devices goes awry, a clockwork man appears accidentally in the 1920s, at a cricket match in a small English village Comical yet mind blowing hijinks ensue.Considered the first cyborg novel, The Clockwork Man was first published in 1923 the same year as Karel Capek s pioneering android play, R.U.R.

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      437 E.V. Odle Annalee Newitz Joshua Glenn
    • thumbnail Title: Free Download [Biography Book] ✓ The Clockwork Man - by E.V. Odle Annalee Newitz Joshua Glenn ✓
      Posted by:E.V. Odle Annalee Newitz Joshua Glenn
      Published :2018-08-19T18:31:52+00:00

    1 thought on “The Clockwork Man

    1. So after a week or so to ponder this book I think I have figured out why I didn't like it.Ostensibly this book is about a 'Clockwork Man' who stumbles back through time from the far future and ends up in the middle of a 1920's English village; his appearance is then followed by the requisite shenanigans. That, however, is not what happens. In fact very little happens in the book (shenanigans or otherwise) because this is not really a novel. There is no protagonist or antagonist, there is no rise [...]

    2. Back in the day, I used to - before finding more complete references - rely upon A Reader's Guide To Science Fiction by Baird Searles, Martin Last, et al. One thing I liked about their format was the "If you liked author X, you'll enjoy author Y" recommendations.So, here goes on The Clockwork Man (about a fellow, when his mechanical parts are functioning properly, is able to navigate the "multiform" universe). If you like the type of humorous tongue-in-cheek science fiction written by, say, Fred [...]

    3. Brilliant and unjustly neglected novel from the mostly forgotten "radium age" between the scientific romance period of HG Wells and Jules Verne, and the golden age of science fiction starting in the 1930s. The writing style reminds me much more of Wells than golden age sci-fi and is much more socially conscious than science fiction in the decades that followed, which often abandoned social critique (in response to McCarthyism and the Red Scare) in favor of hard science and adventure. This book f [...]

    4. The Clockwork Man is quite a remarkable little novel: steampunk before steampunk was cool; one of the first appearances of a cyborg in science fiction literature; and a delicate commentary on modern humanity and its great enemy, time.The novel opens with the farcical setup of the Clockwork Man's abrupt appearance at an early-twentieth-century afternoon cricket match in the countryside, which he ultimately joins and wrecks. The novel soon changes tone, however, and views the threat and promise of [...]

    5. I had never heard of this or even Odle, which is surprising considering it is probably the first android story you would have thought it would famous.The story in itself is rather a fun story. This strange clockwork man arrives in the middle of a cricket match and then goes on to make up the numbers for one team where he is exceptional. Now at this point in the story a knowledge of cricket is useful otherwise some of the story might be missed. The story then goes on to describe how this strange [...]

    6. This book seems like gimmicky speculative fiction (I tend to like non-gimmick speculative fiction, by the way), which in some ways was a bit interesting toward the end. But as a whole, it essentially suggests that individuality despite excessive conflict is better than automaton multi-dimensional maleness. As if these are our only options as a species.

    7. Read this for a book group. The Clockwork Man is considered the first cyborg novel. Writing moves along quickly and is pretty enjoyable, though I was a bit disappointed with the end. This novel will appeal primarily to those interested in the history of sf.

    8. I only recently discovered HiLo Books’ “Radium Age of Science Fiction” series: 10 books from years 1904 – 1933 reissued by the press in 2013. I’ve managed to find three of them in bookstores, and this is the first of those that I’ve read. The premise (cyborg-type future man comes back to the present, wreaks havoc) now is a trope, but the publishers date this as the first cyborg novel. Taken in that light, the reader can see just how inventive Odle is in realizing and describing his [...]

    9. This is a real oddity from the 1920's. A time traveling clockwork man visits 1920's England in the middle of a Cricket match. His antics appear to be inspired by slapstick movies of the early 20th century such as Charlie Chaplin, Laurel and Hardy, and Harold Lloyd, and perhaps more obscure movies about automatons running amok.The back story about how his mysterious "Makers" came to the Earth and abducted all the women and turned all of the men into clockwork beings was one of the more interestin [...]

    10. This book was a gem to read, actually, I listened to it - Ralph Lister did a fantastic job which may have helped me in falling in love with this book. It has a great storyline, starting out in late 1920's at a cricket match. How English! This was written before the famed Golden Age of Science Fiction (Asimov, Bradbury, Silverberg etc.) and has introduced me to what is known as the Radium Age that was written from about 1904 -33. The Clockwork Man has appeared in present day, 1928 or thereabouts, [...]

    11. I enjoyed this little book entirely. I picked it up because of this satirical article claiming that E.V. Odle was a pen name for Virginia Woolf. And, because of the fact it claims to show the first cyborg/robot/automaton/AI in science fiction.This copy came with a forward and introduction that can offer better insight into what it means than I can. I particularly recommend the intro by Annalee Newitz titled “The First Cyborg and the First Singularity” — though after the fact because it giv [...]

    12. A interesting, intellectual little novel. It explores some interesting ideas about human existence and a few about feminism, while also being an early introduction to robotics and the idea of changes to the Time Space continuum. The problem for me is that the book was too much in its own head. There was a lot of sitting around and thinking and wondering and pondering and panicking, without much action to precipitate all of these thoughts. It seemed to me that we need more information and action [...]

    13. Possibly the first novel about a cyborg, it's the story of a weird being who claims to come from thousands of years in the future and from a very different, multidimensional world, and to function thanks to a clock in his head that makes him hugely more evolved and sophisticated than human beings in the 1920s. The small town where he shows up is disrupted by his appearance and his deeds, as discussions and theories divide the local scientists. An intriguing tale with a unexpected turn of events [...]

    14. What a fun well written little English novel - has very deep psychological implementations buried in the play between the clockwork man a made man and a real man from the 20 century - must think more about the effect it has had on me - the clock work man is like us except can travel in time and space but can not love - too complicated he said to design in love that is. I am partial to English novels and Russian lit so you must read this on your own and decide if you think it worthy of 4 stars.

    15. This was a fun little book from 1923, which featured the first appearance of a cyborg in science fiction. A Clockwork Man from 8,000 years in the future shows up at a cricket match and hijinks ensue. He is having a problem with the mechanism in his head and he can't return to the future. It was interesting to read what an author from the '20s thought a future robot would be like. Overall, the book was a quick read that dragged a bit when the cyborg wasn't around.

    16. A strange and quirky little book. Quite funny, but I would say rather bland in its storytelling. A few chapters are eventful and generate a sense of excitement and intrigue, but they are sadly rare. Interesting once again for the science fiction perspective from such an early era.

    17. This is one weird book. It left meI don't know.ing about it a bit after I finished it. I wasn't thinking I liked it or I didn't like it, I was just thinking about it. I'm staring at the stars and I can't figure out how many to give it. Two or three, I guess. What a weird book.

    18. This one was a bit too much of a product of its place and time for me to get into. I don't think I am the target demographic for a book where the first 20% or so of the story is talking about how a person is obviously an outsider because he doesn't know how to play cricket.

    19. Boring, slow and pointless. Only interesting as a historical artifact connecting two much better periods of literature. Life is too short to waste on dull books.

    20. Nice read. 1923 science fiction, considered the first cyborg story. Humorous at times, interesting if you consider the path of sci-fi thereafter.

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