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From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

From the Mixed up Files of Mrs Basil E Frankweiler When suburban Claudia Kincaid decides to run away she knows she doesn t just want to run from somewhere she wants to run to somewhere to a place that is comfortable beautiful and preferably eleg

  • Title: From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler
  • Author: E.L. Konigsburg
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 114
  • Format: Paperback
  • When suburban Claudia Kincaid decides to run away, she knows she doesn t just want to run from somewhere, she wants to run to somewhere to a place that is comfortable, beautiful, and, preferably, elegant She chooses the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City Knowing her younger brother Jamie has money and thus can help her with a serious cash flow problem, she invWhen suburban Claudia Kincaid decides to run away, she knows she doesn t just want to run from somewhere, she wants to run to somewhere to a place that is comfortable, beautiful, and, preferably, elegant She chooses the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City Knowing her younger brother Jamie has money and thus can help her with a serious cash flow problem, she invites him along.Once settled into the museum, Claudia and Jamie find themselves caught up in the mystery of an angel statue that the museum purchased at auction for a bargain price of 225 The statue is possibly an early work of the Renaissance master, Michelangelo, and therefore worth millions Is it Or isn t it Claudia is determined to find out Her quest leads her to Mrs Basil E Frankweiler, the remarkable old woman who sold the statue, and to some equally remarkable discoveries about herself.

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      Published :2019-01-25T04:56:34+00:00

    1 thought on “From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

    1. OK, I'll admit it: I freakin' hate the Newbery Medal. Any time I see it on the cover of a book, I'm 98.5% sure it sucks. All of the books that have been given this "honor" seem to have been written with the intent of teaching kids some crappy history lesson. There's no magic or mystery to any of themading these books is akin to eating dry toast when you know damned well you could cover the bread with butter, cinnamon, and sugar. I mean, if you really want to martyr yourself, do it creatively, li [...]

    2. I first read this book when I was 7-going-on-8. I read it, and then I read it again. Then I read it again, and kept going until, according to my personal mythology, I had read it 11 times. And then I stole my school's copy of the book. I hadn't picked it up for many years since then, but this book is woven into my neural pathways every which way, and rereading it still makes me love it more.The Mixed-Up Files drew me in with its details and paraphernalia (the instrument cases! the transistor rad [...]

    3. This was my son's first book he read entirely in English (he is a rapid read of books in French already!) so I felt I needed to read it too. What a pleasant surprise! We both loved Jaime and Claudia and their adventures while running away and camping out in the Metropolitan Museum in NYC. It is a touching book with lots of life lessons; my favorite quote is "Happiness is excitement that has found a settling place, but there is always a corner of it that keeps flapping around." (P 155)I have to t [...]

    4. From the mixed-up files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, E.L. Konigsburg Elaine Lobl Konigsburg was an American author and illustrator of children's books and young adult fiction. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: بیست و سوم نوامبر سال 2009 میلادی عنوان: فرار به موزه نيويورک؛ نویسنده: ای.ال. کنیگزبرگ؛ مترجم: شهره نورصالحی؛ ویراستار: فریبا نباتی؛ تهران، پیدایش، 1387، در 216 ص، [...]

    5. 99c Kindle sale, Oct. 23, 2017. This short novel is a classic of middle grade fiction, and the 1968 Newbery Award winner. Eleven year old Claudia decides to run away from home. She was tired of arguing about whose turn it was to choose the Sunday night seven-thirty television show, of injustice, and of the monotony of everything.You can tell this is set in an earlier time, before our media entertainment options multiplied. :) Because her little brother Jamie is a lot better at saving money than [...]

    6. My oldest grandson Philip is an avid reader, a trait my wife and I like to encourage. He'd encountered this Newbery award winner in his school library, and wanted to own a copy, so we gave him one for his 11th birthday last fall. When he discovered that I'd never read it (it was first published in 1967, by which time I was in high school, and focusing my reading on more "grown-up" books), he wanted to share it with me, so he loaned me his copy. (Last year, he likewise introduced me to another ki [...]

    7. For his autumnal yet incandescent family tragicomedy, The Royal Tenenbaums, Wes Anderson drew inspiration from a handful of literary works remarkably possessed of whimsy and insightful wit. Chief among these is the late J. D. Salinger’s short but utterly perceptive book, Franny and Zooey, whose title characters are members of the Glass family, the basis for the dysfunctional Tenenbaums in Anderson’s film. The eccentric director, drawing further attention to his enchantment with Salinger’s [...]

    8. There are certain, special books that I don't want to give up once finished. I guess to prolong the separation and perhaps to somehow physically absorb whatever magic it possesses, I'll find myself pressing my palms against the book, sandwiching it. It doesn't happen very often. But it did happen with this book.I had never read this book growing up. But I'm so glad that I finally got around to it.What is it that makes this book so wonderful? Let's begin with Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler's clever na [...]

    9. "I think you should learn, of course, and some days you must learn a great deal. But you should also have days when you allow what is already in you to swell up inside of you until it touches everything. And you can feel it inside you. If you never take time out to let that happen, then you just accumulate facts, and they begin to rattle around inside of you. You can make noise with them, but never really feel anything with them. It's hollow."Here's a book that's lost none of its charm. Siblings [...]

    10. I read this years ago as a child and just finished re-reading it with my 7-year-old son. It actually touched off a lot of interesting discussions about what has changed and what has stayed the same in the years since the book was first published in 1967 (my son piped up with all kinds of objections throughout the book, like "what about the motion detectors and the lasers around the art?"). Of course today admission is no longer free at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, no one is allowed to bring i [...]

    11. I enjoyed this one more than the kids, it's an odd little book. The central story does capture the imagination of a child like few can, but the trappings are so fussy and odd. I think the narrative device (the titular Mrs. Frankweiler has a first-person narration) confused the kids, and I don't think they really connected with the themes of secrets and adventure. There are some very complex ideas here. But all those things work beautifully for adults and after you read it as a child all those th [...]

    12. I rated this five stars a long time ago, out of pure nostalgia, without really remembering much about the book beyond "they stayed in the museum." Well, I just finished reading it out loud to my son, and I would just like to reaffirm: YES, five stars. No question.The plot is so subtle, compared with so much of what is being published now! But wow these kids are individuals. Wow they talk like real humans and have a real and wonderful relationship with each other. My son described Mrs. Basil E. F [...]

    13. I'm not sure how I missed reading this Newberry gem as a youngster, being the wordy-nerdy bookworm that I was, and still am. But somehow, I overlooked this NYC dawning of age adventure centering around the Metropolitan Museum of Art and self realization. That is, until now. Better late than never, right? Proof positive, you're never too old to change course, make a new goal, revisit your childhood, and/or correct an oversight. I didn't relate to it as intimately as I did the The Boxcar Children. [...]

    14. I honestly have no idea why, but there was something about this book (I guess the adventure?) that I absolutely loved when I was younger. Really cute story of two kids that run away to live in a museum, skirting the cops and sleeping in the priceless beds and having a series of adventures in the museum!If you like this and want more, visit my blog, Literary Cafe: literarycafe.weebly

    15. This was a ridiculously charming little book.I think the thing that made it such a great children's book even though I'm definitely not the target audience was because I really grew to care for the main characters, Claudia and Jamie. Reading about them getting into scrapes and going on adventures filled me with a warm and fuzzy feeling.Claudia and Jamie had a wonderful sister-brother relationship that was portrayed realistically. While they teased and got annoyed by one another, they also grew c [...]

    16. I loved this book so much as a child and it was a pleasure to revisit it all these years later. Who didn't fantasize about running away from home and having a wonderful adventure like Claudia and Jaimie? I didn't remember much of the story, but for some reason the one detail that stuck in my mind was how they took a bath in the fountain and used the coins that people tossed in to supplement their income. The other thing I remember is the same feeling I had when I finished it this time: it ended [...]

    17. From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler By E.L. Konigsburg This is a delightful story for children of all ages. I'm wondering why I never discovered this book when I was a kid? Claudia is planning to run away. She wants a different life, than that of the oldest child, with so many responsibilities. Her brother Jamie doesn't know it yet, but she has chosen him to be her companion. One reason she has chosen Jamie, is because he is good with money. Claudia usually spends her money on h [...]

    18. I had not planned on reading this novel, but I found this book on a random book shelf in my house, so I decided to give it a go. I feel like this is one of those books I should have read at least once sometime during my childhood, but I just never got to it. Well, I did in fact enjoy this book. I rated this novel four stars because although I did like it a lot, I just didn’t love it. It was pleasurable reading about the adventure that Claudia and Jamie had. This adventure/runaway ended up last [...]

    19. January 1967 Birthday ReadI want to go back to 1967, where it was free admission to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the daily New York Times cost a dime. And I want to be 12-years-old and live in the Met! This was another great read that I think I missed as a young reader. Brother and sister runaways, a little bit of a mystery, and a whole lot of art, this was a really fun read!

    20. I wish I had discovered this as a child. I find it charming as an adult. At the correct age, I might have found it magical. It's a nice adventure. Somewhat didactic of course, but not overly so. I like what it says about differing values.

    21. A book I’d throw into the categories of “Book With Titles that are Better than the Actual Story” and “Books with Plot Summaries that are Better than the Actual Story”.I grew impatient with this book. Why did Claudia want to run away? If it was her family that was the problem, why did she take one of her brothers along? She picked the Metropolitan Museum of Art as her refuge, but she didn’t seem to enjoy much of the art there. The whole story is written as if Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler [...]

    22. This was one of the key books of my American childhood. All these years later, phrases were still familiar to me, such as Jamie’s frequent exclamation of “Oh, boloney!” I clearly remembered the delicious overall sense of adventure and secrecy. On this reread I found it a tiny bit dated, what with the impossibly low prices and Claudia wearing a petticoat. Some things haven’t changed, though. Konigsburg captures school group chatter and brother/sister banter perfectly. The museum and archi [...]

    23. Claudia and Jamie Kincaid decide to run away and live in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC. They take their instrument cases filled with clothes and Jamie's transistor radio. They live in the museum for about a week on about $28 and some change. They discover that there's more to life than what they thought and that some experiences make you into a better person.Loved the relationship between Claude and her brother, loved how she constantly kept correcting his grammar and how he was in charg [...]

    24. 3.5 StarsI used to love this book as a kid- the story of two siblings who run away and stay at the Metropolitan Museum of Art was so magical to me. I'm happy to say it still holds up as an adult. I can't wait to read this to my girls when they're a bit older.

    25. Another book I missed when I was the "right" age to read it. I tried to judge it as I would have when I was ten, and not as a 50-year-old appalled at the ungrateful brat protagonists. I'd have enjoyed it quite a bit, I think.Reader was good.

    26. A beautiful story about a brother and sister running away and deciding to live at the metropolitan museum of art. They get embroiled in a mystery about who's the creature of an angel statue. Read from the first person point of view narrative of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, it gives a different kind of insight into the children's motives and behaviors since we are really seeing the events from the outside. The book is unique and heartwarming, and I especially enjoyed the relationship between the br [...]

    27. Alright, here we go with another book from my past that was forced down my throat by the bare hands of an english teacher. I hated this book so much that I decided to just not read it and struggle my way through that time of the year. After arriving to school the morning after i decided that, i panicked! The current chapter that was to be discussed abruptly fell into the lesson plans of the teacher that morning and i began to panick. I glanced around at the obedient students who plucked out thei [...]

    28. I have to admit that I'm pretty disappointed in this one. The premise of kids running away to and living in the Metropolitan Museum of Art sounded pretty fantastic, but it really wasn't very exciting at all. There was a lot of "filler" dialogue and constant rambling on that didn't really drive the story. The "secret" about Angel just seemed pretty anti-climactic. Half of the book seemed devoted to describing bathing, eating, and planning things, and the "mystery" aspect just got lost. Claudia wa [...]

    29. Inventive, imaginative, and a lot of fun to read. The story of a girl and her brother who run away the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NY City. A very charming book. Makes one yearn for a visit to the Met or any museum, preferably a behind the scenes one! And it contains seemingly helpful instructions on how to sucessfully run away. ;-)

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