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The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy

The Claim of Reason Wittgenstein Skepticism Morality and Tragedy This handsome new edition of Stanley Cavell s landmark text first published years ago provides a new preface that discusses the reception and influence of his work which occupies a unique niche

  • Title: The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy
  • Author: Stanley Cavell
  • ISBN: 9780195131079
  • Page: 192
  • Format: Paperback
  • This handsome new edition of Stanley Cavell s landmark text, first published 20 years ago, provides a new preface that discusses the reception and influence of his work, which occupies a unique niche between philosophy and literary studies.

    • [PDF] Download ✓ The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy | by ✓ Stanley Cavell
      192 Stanley Cavell
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      Posted by:Stanley Cavell
      Published :2018-08-02T02:15:26+00:00

    1 thought on “The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy

    1. This book, this gorgeous, fresh, brand-spanking-new book, smells like a little slice of pulp heaven. It's a wild and heady perfect bound aroma that acts upon your literary libido like a platter of oysters freckled with chilies and a Dian Parkinson Playboyâ„¢ Special on the side

    2. Friends and Monsters,The world is too full of meaning. It is spilling uncontrollably from my sentences. And yet I feel very much like you understand what I mean.Please do,V

    3. I'm very enthusiastic about the way Cavell does things (though his writing does feel verbose at times). I don't have the most sophisticated understanding of /The Claim of Reason/ yet but I would characterize him as approaching basic longstanding questions (how do I know I'm not dreaming? how do I know that other people are conscious? how are moral claims justified?) through the work of writers like Wittgenstein and Shakespeare in an unusual and edifying way: rather than as intellectual puzzles s [...]

    4. Cavell is brilliant when it comes to synthesizing diverse strains of intellectual history. What's more, his readings of canonical works of philosophy and literature are always original and frequently dazzling. His prose style, however, is unbearably obtuse -- even for a philosopher. One lesson that he failed to pick up from Wittgenstein: "That which can be said can be said simply."

    5. A little unwieldy towards the end. But restored my faith in philosophy as something that addresses questions and concerns that I have.

    6. Here, as in all his writings, Cavell is like a philosophical DJ, cutting and scratching, spinning back, and bending the pitch of Wittgenstein, Austin, Descartes, Thompson Clarke, Shakespeare, Heidegger, et al. Stephen Mulhall has a great paper called "On Refusing to Begin" in which he wonders what The Claim of Reason is about, what kind of text it is. A tough question, to be sure, but for starters, we know it is, in part, a grand remix of the Philosophical Investigations, the Meditations, Othell [...]

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