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Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises

Fiesta The Sun Also Rises Paris in the twenties Pernod parties and expatriate Americans loose living on money from home Jake is wildly in love with Brett Ashley aristocratic and irresistibly beautiful but with an abandoned

  • Title: Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises
  • Author: Ernest Hemingway
  • ISBN: 9780099908500
  • Page: 308
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Paris in the twenties Pernod, parties and expatriate Americans, loose living on money from home Jake is wildly in love with Brett Ashley, aristocratic and irresistibly beautiful, but with an abandoned, sensuous nature that she cannot change When the couple drifts to Spain to the dazzle of the fiesta and the heady atmosphere of the bullfight, their affair is strained byParis in the twenties Pernod, parties and expatriate Americans, loose living on money from home Jake is wildly in love with Brett Ashley, aristocratic and irresistibly beautiful, but with an abandoned, sensuous nature that she cannot change When the couple drifts to Spain to the dazzle of the fiesta and the heady atmosphere of the bullfight, their affair is strained by new passions, new jealousies, and Jake must finally learn that he will never possess the woman he loves.

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      Published :2019-02-05T01:23:39+00:00

    1 thought on “Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises

    1. What I learned from this book (in no particular order): 1. Jews are stubborn.2. Being a Jew in Princeton sucks.3. Being impotent sucks, especially if you are in love with a beautiful woman.4. A beautiful woman is built with curves like the hull of a racing boat. Women make swell friends.5. If you suffer from domestic abuse, the best way to work it out is by going through as many men as possible in the shortest time, and then discard them like wet tissues once you’re done --- if you happen to b [...]

    2. I was sitting on the patio of a bar in Key West Florida. It was August, it was hot. The bar was on the beach where there was lots of sand and water. In the water I saw dolphins and waves. The dolphins jumped and the waves waved.My glass was empty. The waiter walked up to my table. “More absinthe miss?” He asked. “No, I better not. *burp*” I put my hand over my glass “I read somewhere that it can cause hallucinations and nightmares. Just some ice water please.” I said. He put and empt [...]

    3. Oh, to have been Ernest Hemingway. Except for the whole shotgun thing. He was a man, back when that meant something. Whatever that means. He had it all: a haunted past; functional alcoholism; a way with words; a way with women; and one hell of a beard. I mean, this was the guy who could measure F. Scott Fitzgerald's penis without anyone batting an eye. He was just that cool. I love Hemingway. You might have guessed that, but let's make it clear off the bat. For Whom the Bell Tolls is in my top f [...]

    4. If I were Hemingway's English teacher (or anyone's any kind of teacher) I'd say, "This reads more like a screenplay than a novel. Where are your descriptions, where is the emotion??"And he would say something like, "The lack of complex descriptions helps focus on the complexities and emptiness of the characters' lives, and the emotion is there, it's only just beneath the surface, struggling to be free!"And I'd say, "OK, I'll move ya from a C to C+."Basically The Sun Also Rises shows that Hemingw [...]

    5. This may be my favorite book of all time. At any rate, it's definitely on the top ten list and by far my favorite Hemingway (and I do love some Hemingway). The first time I read this, I loved Lady Brett Ashley. Is she a bitch? Sure, but I don't think she ever intentionally sets out to hurt anyone. And it might be argued that she has reason to be one: her first true love dies in the war from dysentery (not exactly the most noble of deaths) and she's physically threatened by Lord Ashley, forced to [...]

    6. I've read this book every year since 1991, and it is never the same book. Like so many things in this world, The Sun Also Rises improves with age and attention.Some readings I find myself in love with Lady Brett Ashley. Then I am firmly in Jake Barnes' camp, feeling his pain and wondering how he stays sane with all that happens around him. Another time I can't help but feel that Robert Cohn is getting a shitty deal and find his behavior not only understandable but restrained. Or I am with Mike a [...]

    7. I think there is something cheesey about reviewing an old book, but I felt I had to write something, as I constructed my senior thesis in college with this book as the cornerstone, I have read it at least six times, and I consider The Sun Also Rises to be the Great American Novel. Why?1) Hemingway was, if nothing else, a great American. A renaissance man, a soldier, a fisherman, and a sportswriter, a romantic and an argumentatively direct chauvinist, a conflicted religious agnostic who never aba [...]

    8. There’s a very nice restaurant that my wife and I frequent that has become our go-to spot for special occasions like birthdays or anniversaries. When we first started going here, I saw that they were serving absinthe. I’d been curious about the drink since first reading Hemingway’s descriptions of it in The Sun Also Rises back in high school. Banned for most of the twentieth century in the U.S. for wildly exaggerated claims of it’s hallucinogenic qualities, it was made available to be im [...]

    9. Just finished a re-read of The Sun Also Rises (my favorite Hemingway book-last read in 2014). I didn’t provide a review at the time so I thought I would (try to) explain why this book speaks to me. First, it is deceptively easy to fall into with its short sentences and simple language. Nothing is forced. However, it is the mood Hemingway creates in this novel which really engages me. Perhaps that says as much about me as it does about the novel. The appeal is not so much about the story; it is [...]

    10. “Funny,” Brett said. “How one doesn’t mind the blood.”4th reading. IMHO, this is one of the essential books of life. It never fails. It possesses—for the right reader—an enormity of narrative pleasure and it grips from the very first line. Some notes.The passage at the Paris nightclub with the gay boys doesn’t bother me as it used to. Our narrator, Jake, knows he’s being unreasonable. The queers, with whom Brett arrives at the club, have working penises and choose not to use th [...]

    11. Everything is still tonight, like a friend was talking and I didn’t hear her until she stopped. Like absence. Coming back from vacation has that feeling of loss because all of the friendships resolve into something real, whatever that may be. Whenever I am away from home, I crave The Sun Also Rises. I think it got into my blood from reading it again and again at impressionable ages. Since I returned home this time, a couple of weeks ago, I can’t stop thinking about my friends in this book an [...]

    12. She Aches Just like a WomanI’ll start off with something that I thought was interesting (hint: it borders on being annoying). For the first 75 pages, characters move in and out of this book with such swiftness and with no mention of physical description or notable characteristics, it mimics the effect of being at a really crowded party where you meet face after face, name after name and you have no time to process who is who, why they are significant and if you should even bother to remember t [...]

    13. Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises could be read like it's some kind of evil social experiment. You take a room and you put in three elephants. (You may also choose to build the room around the elephants for practical reasons.) You give the elephants names, and paint these names on their flanks in letters big, bright and red. You call them Impotence, Jealousy and Loneliness. Then you have a group of people enter that same room, a couple of guys and a gorgeous girl. They can do anything they like, they g [...]

    14. Yes, impeccable and precise prose. Yes, a superstar writer. Yes, I hadn't read it before, but that's totally okay. Somehow, I couple this quaint piece--most of the characters are blah because they belong to that blah generation, I mean, what to do if not fight in war?--with the monstrously intolerable novel by Malcolm Lowry, "Under the Volcano." But thank god this one has the European charm that is all but ridiculed in Lowry's take on some similarly lost days in Mexico. Here are some lost days i [...]

    15. The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway’s brilliant 1926 novel about the Lost Generation is a must read for Twentieth Century literature.I was assigned this as a junior in college, our English professor told us to read it and to be prepared to talk next week. The next class was spent on students describing their thoughts about the novel and what we thought it meant. With a smug smile and somewhat of a condescending air, the instructor stepped form his podium and said something to the effect that [...]

    16. “Don't you ever get the feeling that all your life is going by and you're not taking advantage of it? Do you realize you've lived nearly half the time you have to live already?" "Yes, every once in a while." "Do you know that in abou thirty- five more years we'll be dead?" "What the hell, Robert," I said. "What the hell." "I'm serious." "It's one thig I don't worry about," I said. "You ought to." "I've had plenty to worry about one time or other. I'm through worrying." "Well, I want to go to S [...]

    17. While I was reading this I thought time and again about a quote from another book.This one: Mrs. Poe“That’s it!” I dropped the magazine.“What Mamma?” asked Vinnie“This silly alliteration – it’s clinkering, clattering claptrap.”Ellen’s face was as straight as a judge’s on court day. “You mean it’s terrible, trifling trash?”I nodded. “Jumbling, jarring junk.”Vinnie jumped up, trailing shawls like a mummy trails bandages. “No it’s piggly, wiggly poop!”“Don’ [...]

    18. There will always be a special place in my heart for this book. It's easily one of my favorite books of all time. Definitely my favorite Hemingway book (it's quite different from the rest). No, it's not perfect. Yes, it gets a bit boring in the middle when its main focus is on bull fighting. But for the most part, the story is funny and wonderful and quite touching. The dialogue is so alive, it practically has a pulse. Nobody writes dialogue like that anymore. It's snappy, fast, witty, honest an [...]

    19. This is my favorite Hemingway novel, maybe because it was my first. The Sun Also Rises was to Hemingway what The Great Gatsby was to Fitzgerald.

    20. I finished The Sun Also Rises in a hotel room in Vienna, and reading it while in transit in Europe perhaps affected how much I liked it – I liked it very much, far more than I expected to after my ambivalent reaction to A Farewell to Arms. The open, wide-ranging view of Europe from Paris to Pamplona is something I feel very in need of right now, and Hemingway's hungover cynicism masquerading as wisdom seems here much more beautiful to me. This is particularly so because instead of the grand tr [...]

    21. "'The Sun Also Rises' is about bullfighting, bullslinging and bullshit." Zelda Fitzgerald[[3.4 stars]]2d from left is British socialite Duff Twysden (on whom "Lady Brett Ashley" was based), and next to her is Hadley Richardson, Hemingway's 1st wifeOn my mission over the past 8 years to read all "classics," this one strikes me the least.The novel is apparently held in high esteem now for Hemingway's style than for the story's substance, which is a bit dated by its reliance on the people, places a [...]

    22. The bored, the disenchanted, the wandering wondering and/or nearly thoughtless (except for where their next drink will come from) ex-pat characters, these borderline socialites fighting off ennui, of Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises do very little worth reading about and yet read you do. Blame it on the author's clean writing style or his choice of scenes, choosing to paint with poignant words almost documentary style clips of cultural happenings that still excites even in this television/internet [...]

    23. Such a boring book. I get that Hemingway captures the decadence and dissolution of the Lost Generation. I get that his writing style brings to mind adjectives like "sparse" and "blunt" and "elegiac." But I do not get how to find enjoyment from such a repetitive book that glamorizes violence, excessive drinking, outdated forms of masculinity, homophobia, and antisemitism. One could argue that Hemingway reports these toxic ideas as ideals of the time, but even then, he does nothing special with hi [...]

    24. Meh. I think I would have liked this book a lot more if something had actually happened. The plot doesn't really flow; it's just a bunch of events strung together that go like this: work a bit at a newspaper agency, waffle around Paris for ages, travel around France, argue, pine for some woman who I thought was a man for several pages because her name is "Brett", go to Spain, go trout fishing, take a nap, go to some bullfights, pine and complain some more, go back to Paris. In between every sing [...]

    25. The Sun Also Rises, Ernest HemingwayThe Sun Also Rises is a 1926 novel written by American author Ernest Hemingway about a group of American and British expatriates who travel from Paris to the Festival of San Fermín in Pamplona to watch the running of the bulls and the bullfights. An early and enduring modernist novel, it received mixed reviews upon publication. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: بیستم ماه اکتبر سال 2012 میلادیعنوان: خورشید هم‌چنان م [...]

    26. I honestly didn't think that this book would be as bad as it was. I was assigned to read this book for class, and the books we've read for class have hitherto been better than this. This book has virtually no plot, and the characters are very flat. The entire book consists of a group of people, each of them disliking at least one person in their party, driving around Paris drinking. Then they decide to go to Spain and drink. So the rest of the book is about them drinking with each other, drinkin [...]

    27. I gave this one star because I wasn't old enough to drink or really enjoy much of anything when I first read it, and I haven't read it again since.I'm almost certain I'd still hate it though.

    28. Let me begin by saying that I hold Hemingway in high esteem: so much so that while at the Key West Literary Seminar this year I visited his home for a second time. I have read nearly all of his novels and admire his devotion to writing insofar as he lived humbly in Paris among the Lost Generation to establish himself as a novelist. He paid his existential and literary dues as a novelist and was richly rewarded for his gifts. "The Sun Also Rises" is an early work and, although one can see his pro [...]

    29. In the case of books I've read but disliked, I often indicate that fact with a one-star rating, so people browsing my shelves won't be misled as to my tastes. Some Goodreaders object to the practice of giving single-star ratings without a review to explain why; one likened it to a drive-by shooting. Mindful of their point, I've tried to go back and add reviews in some of these cases; and (to keep the shooting metaphor) this is one where I'm quite glad to come back and pump a few more bullets int [...]

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