- Books

Waterloo: A Near Run Thing

Waterloo A Near Run Thing The first shots were fired at about eleven thirty on a Sunday morning in June by nine o clock that night forty thousand men lay dead or wounded and Napoleon had abandoned not only his army bu

  • Title: Waterloo: A Near Run Thing
  • Author: David Howarth
  • ISBN: 9781842127193
  • Page: 383
  • Format: Paperback
  • The first shots were fired at about eleven thirty on a Sunday morning in June, 1815 by nine o clock that night, forty thousand men lay dead or wounded, and Napoleon had abandoned not only his army, but all hope of recovering his empire From the recollections of the men who were there, esteemed author David Howarth has recreated the battle as it appeared to them on the daThe first shots were fired at about eleven thirty on a Sunday morning in June, 1815 by nine o clock that night, forty thousand men lay dead or wounded, and Napoleon had abandoned not only his army, but all hope of recovering his empire From the recollections of the men who were there, esteemed author David Howarth has recreated the battle as it appeared to them on the day it was fought He follows the fortunes of men of all ranks and on both sides But it is on the French side that the mysteries remain Why did Ney attack with cavalry alone And was Napoleon s downfall really due to the minor ailment he suffered that day Beautifully written, vivid, and unforgettable, this illuminating history is impossible to put down.

    • [PDF] ↠ Unlimited å Waterloo: A Near Run Thing : by David Howarth ✓
      383 David Howarth
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ↠ Unlimited å Waterloo: A Near Run Thing : by David Howarth ✓
      Posted by:David Howarth
      Published :2018-04-20T16:40:22+00:00

    1 thought on “Waterloo: A Near Run Thing

    1. Another, solid hack at history for Howarth!Personally, I love myself some history, but some authors do present it in a rather dry and academic wayobably because they're hoping their book will get picked up for college course reading, so they tailor it to the very textbooky style that universities look for. That's useful for class structure, but it doesn't often lend itself to a pleasurable read. David Howarth has a great way of casually writing about that old, musty stuff. In Waterloo: A Near Ru [...]

    2. My paternal Grandfather, now long deceased, smoked Donatello cigars. And at regular intervals I'd get through the post a collection of cigarette cards. My favourite was a set showing people from the Battle of Waterloo (18th June 1815). They came with a display poster which I had up on the bedroom wall probably until I was thirteen and we moved house. Among others it featured Marshal Berthier, General Gneisenau playing the flute for some reason, and the charge of the Scots Greys. According to thi [...]

    3. Waterloo: A Near Run Thing is an excellent introduction to the great battle that ended Napoleon’s dreams forever. I have not read about this battle or much about Napoleon. This book does not burden with extensive history or details of the armies. It tells the stories of men on both sides, from Dawn to Evening on one day, with a short few pages about the aftermath. Liberally sprinkled with maps, sketches, color reproductions of paintings of the men, terrain, key features of the battle. A good b [...]

    4. The brilliance of this book is its approach – Howarth goes through the day, section by section, and depicts what Waterloo was like from the perspective of several different men. Dry and confusing strategy is cast aside in favor of real-life experience and descriptions of the truly breath-taking gusts of fate that determined this battle. Good thing you know the outcome before you start! And, as a bonus, sort of, I have to admit that if anyone can breathe humanity into that dreadful little megal [...]

    5. This is one of those books that I know I will read probably dozens of times in my life. The narrative style, based entirely upon eyewitness accounts of the battle, is extremely compelling. It's not long, but it will leave you feeling as though you had actually witnessed Waterloo. While the book does focus mostly on the Allied experience to the neglect of the French, Howarth explains in his introduction that it was unfortunately necessary because, having lost and no doubt feeling a bit bitter or [...]

    6. One of my favourite works of military history has always been 'The Face of Battle' by John Keegan. Major battles seen from the viewpoint of individual combatants. I stumbled on a hardcover version of David Howarth's classic at a local market recently for a paltry $5 and sat down to read it immediately. It is everything that Keegan's book is and more. Waterloo recounted from the viewpoint of a number of individuals who fought on that day.I have read every book on this battle that I have been able [...]

    7. A decisive battle told from the point of view of the soldiers. Interesting and well written, it makes clear how hideous war is and reinforces the notion that soldiers survive major battles by luck - only luck. And, if the author is correct, Napoleon lost because he was distracted by his hemorrhoids.Go figure

    8. The interweaving of genuine, men-in-the-field accounts from different parts and different sides of the battle give this account of the battle of Waterloo a real sense of gritty realism and authenticity that you will find hard to beat.

    9. Having known nothing and not studying Waterloo this is a fantastic history book, very informative highly recommended.

    10. Mesmerizing and written as if it were on the day of the battle; with the fluffy language of the early 19th century included! The author seems to capture the soldiers memoirs so vividly and still retains the skill to tell the immense detail of the battle of Waterloo. At times I feel I am reading a graphic novel and at others I return to the reality of the brutal history. The memoirs add such a vivacious character to the battle, however it still reminds us of the horrors of war. Packed with countl [...]

    11. I bought this book together with "Trafalgar" (above) as part of a two-book box set at a used book sale. I had long been curious about the details of this battle but had never read anything about it before, and felt that David Howarth's uniquely concise writing style (as an historian) would be a way to be introduced to something I'd likely never read another book about. I was intrigued by how singular this battle was in that Napoleon behaved quite out of character in key ways that cost him the ba [...]

    12. With the bicentennial of the battle of Waterloo coming on, I told myself I'd read a couple of books about it, to understand it better.David Howarth's book, about the events of the day of the battle, is a very readable narrative, told mostly from the viewpoints of half a dozen soldiers who were there.Beware, those of us who think we know about the battle of Waterloo from re-playing it in wargames, or reading a synopsis of it in a history text -- the real thing was an infinitely bloodier and more [...]

    13. A minute-by-minute review of the greatest battle in history is provided, mostly from the allied side, which brings the battlefield events to life. It's all a bit gnarly, what with the explicit descriptions of heads blown apart by cannonballs and the like, but the book definitely makes the strategy and the tactics very understandable to the lowest common denominator reader (me).Napoleon's strange behaviour is explained (piles) and Wellington comes across as the cool-ass dude that he really was. H [...]

    14. With reading this book, although I hate to say it, comes the overused 'eye opener' cliche. The reader will experience overwhelming shock as they delve into the atmosphere of chaos, brutality and courage. I highly recommend this to any who have any admiration of great men and great acts, of tales of courage and triumph but also of pain, death and desperation. The line that sticks in my memory, which gives the reader a glimpse into the attitude of this time was the description of cannon fire:"You [...]

    15. Howarth's book, though at first glance somewhat dated, has stood the test of time as the most compelling narrative of the events of June 18, 1815. This was the first book on the battle I had ever read (several years ago), and it helped launch me on a Napoleonic fascination that compelled me to travel across the ocean and visit the battlefield of Waterloo in 2008. In the spirit of Bruce Catton, Howarth writes not with a scholarly pen but with one best suited to the novelist, an approach which giv [...]

    16. Near first person(s) recounting of seven of the bloodiest hours ever fought (perhaps: who really knows). At turns Mesmerizing and horrendous. Incredibly brave? Incredibly foolhardy? What is one to think of those that go into battle in such fashion? I readily admit that it is beyond my fathoming. It makes for high drama and stirring history, But at the expense of 40,000 men and 10,000 horses, it comes at a very high price. Stirringly and feelingly told, the author has done the battle and the men [...]

    17. A fantastic look at the Battle, from a much more grounded perspective. Very refreshing to see it more from the eyes of the men who fought it, rather than the dry, dull writings of too many history books.You feel for the men taking part, and whilst you learn of the battle it's in a much more dramatic and enjoyable fashion. It makes you imagine the terror and fear, the bravery and cowardice shown, and makes you sympathise with the regular man and woman involved with the battle.Recommend to all ent [...]

    18. A brief concise narrative of one of the great determining incidents of recent history; the stopping of a despot.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *