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The Forgetting Room: A Fiction

The Forgetting Room A Fiction Readers are invited to delve into the journal of Armon Hurt a sad discontented man who discovers his inner fire When his artist grandfather dies leaving him the family home in Spain Armon travels

  • Title: The Forgetting Room: A Fiction
  • Author: Nick Bantock
  • ISBN: 9780002251761
  • Page: 473
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Readers are invited to delve into the journal of Armon Hurt, a sad, discontented man who discovers his inner fire When his artist grandfather dies, leaving him the family home in Spain, Armon travels to Andalusia with the intention of selling the property Once there, however, he finds a sealed cardboard case containing a small oil painting and a surreal booklet.As he exaReaders are invited to delve into the journal of Armon Hurt, a sad, discontented man who discovers his inner fire When his artist grandfather dies, leaving him the family home in Spain, Armon travels to Andalusia with the intention of selling the property Once there, however, he finds a sealed cardboard case containing a small oil painting and a surreal booklet.As he examines these mysterious artifacts, Armon realizes that he is holding both his grandfather s last communication to him and a puzzle He begins to decipher the conundrum, and as each new answer leads to questions, Armon finds himself painting furiously in his grandfather s old studio strangely compelled to create a picture that is somehow linked to his legacy.Featuring paintings, drawings, collages, and paper foldouts, this is no ordinary novel The Forgetting Room is a handmade treasure, a seamless blend of artistry and language, and a tantalizing read.

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      Published :2018-010-05T02:57:33+00:00

    1 thought on “The Forgetting Room: A Fiction

    1. The Forgetting Room is a bewitching blend of art and text. Armon inherits his grandfather's house in Spain; before putting the house on the market, he ventures to Spain to explore the contents of the house. There he discovers his grandfather has left behind a mysterious trail of clues for Armon to follow. While Armon puzzles the trail of clues, he constructs a collage. The reader is made privy to the collage as it evolves from a simple sketch to a multi-layered work of art with brooding colors. [...]

    2. In my 20th year, I picked up a copy of Griffin & Sabine - An Extraordinary Correspondence while loitering at the Wordsworth Book Store in Harvard Square. I was stone-broke — living on crackers, jello and sno-cones… and this was a great way to spend a weekend. I was also in the Oxytocin throes of new love so I fell. I fell really really hard. It had that voyeuristic concept (like when you are reading letters that high school boyfriends wrote your mom) that gave me chills and the delusiona [...]

    3. The images and imagery provided by the words are beautiful. I put this book on my list of favorites because of what it did for my art. It opened me up in my art more then I can ever explain.But I don't think what I got from it what most people reading the book would get out of it. The story is a good story and if you liked the Griffin and Sabine Series then you'll most likely enjoy The Forgetting Room too. Currently reading again - 1/22/09

    4. So yesterday I received an anonymous gift in the post. Always intrigued by packages arriving in my name—and especially when it is not an "ordering week" in which I am waiting all too impatiently for UPS, FedEx, USPS, and horseback rider to fill my front porch with beautiful brown packages—I tore into the wrapping while driving down the road. Instantly I knew who it was from even though there was no insert, label, or other clue. (And she has been properly thanked for such an amazing gift.) Bo [...]

    5. Audiobook. Abridged.I don't know if the reason I didn't care for this audiobook is because it was abridged or that I have absolutely no artistic bent, maybe it's both. I thought the hero sounded like a spoiled brat. When his grandmother and grandfather had decided after their house burnt down to move into the great-grandfather's house, he pretty much cut them off. Even when his grandmother died, he didn't bother to go to the funeral because his dad wasn't going. After his grandfather dies and le [...]

    6. The writing was very beautiful and evoking. This author is very good at phrasing things the perfect way. The story was also pretty interesting. A short, nice read!

    7. Perplexing. Beautifully written. Some gorgeous phrasing, which I copied in my journal in order to think deeply about it later.

    8. Some might think Bantock is a one-trick pony, but I personally enjoy the addition of his own art and pull-out material in his books thus far. In "The Forgetting Room," Armon's grandfather has died, leaving him a house in Spain. His grandfather, an artist and all-around playful man, leaves clues to some greater understanding of the man himself cast about in the house. Throughout the course of the book, Armon begins slowly coaxing out an artistic side of himself that he never really pursued during [...]

    9. I am conflicted about this book. I did love the premise itself. The main character has received an inheritance from his grandfather, a home in Spain. His grandfather seems to have been a stronger influence on him than his own father, and spent a lot of time with him as a youth teaching him to paint. The book covers 9 days in Spain where he plans to see the house, and get it on the market to sell. His time there is spent attempting to unlock clues his grandfather left him. My problem with the boo [...]

    10. This book brought me back to myself. What an intriguing legacy to leave I won't spoil it, but as an artist myself, I'd love to do the same. Especially delightful since the studio descriptions, his process while collaging, and the sense of being apart of it make it an almost tactile read. It felt like taking a deep, relaxing breath when I didn't realize I'd been holding it. No surprise that I'm now in an uber productive phase in my studio.

    11. I got this book from a Goodwill store during Labor day weekend. I like Bantock’s combination of word and pictures. I read the Artful Dodger which has a small mention of TFR. I was a little bit disappointed. Griffin & Sabine series got the full explanation. What’s unique about TFR is that Nick describes his painting process and shows how a painting evolves. I’m not sure if I liked the completed painting. For me it was obliterated with too many bits but rich with layers. What I like is t [...]

    12. I really enjoyed the Griffin and Sabine books I've read and so when I found this book I was very excited. In it the character, whose name I can't remember travels to Spain to decide on selling the house of his recently deceased and estranged grandfather. While they were close when he was young time and distance and a hinted at rift between father and son (in this case the grandfather and the father of the boy) keeps them apart. The grandfather was an artist and the grandson dabbles but cannot fi [...]

    13. I'm baffled by all the positive reviews of this book. It fell very flat for me, and definitely wasn't as good as Griffin and Sabine.Armon Hurt goes to Ronda, Spain, to empty out his grandfather's house after he died. Despite the fact that his grandparents essentially gave him all the love and affection that his own parents didn't, and despite the fact that he and his grandfather bonded over art, Armon hadn't seen his grandfather since he and his parents relocated to the States. So he finally for [...]

    14. When his grandfather dies, Armon inherits the family home in Ronda, Spain, and finds himself trying to unravel the surreal conundrum his grandfather has left for him. Armon begins to remember his childhood art lessons, and gradually, as his grandfather's studio takes hold of him he finds himself pulled, day by day, toward a most extraordinary, elliptic link with his past.I can't rate this book as it combines the written word and an art project that the protagonist, Armon, works on throughout the [...]

    15. Throughout 'The Forgetting Room', the main character, Armon, transition in front of your eyes. At first, he is shy and keeps to himself. He is only in Spain to go through some of his grandfathers stuff. Through a series of riddles and game his dead grandfather set up for him, he starts to open up. When his grandfather died he inherited his house and everything in it which included a box of riddles he was supposed to solve. He started painting and in some way it brought him closer to his grandfat [...]

    16. Sometimes the value of a book is determined by the reader's mindset at the onset of the read. In the case of Bantock's "The Forgetting Room", my particular circumstances at the time made it a perfect fit.This is the kind of story that makes one think and on many levels. Letting go of blame, forgiveness, moving on, looking at the big picture without being distracted by the details and so on, I found many parallels applicable to issues in my own life. Perhaps more suitable to one's artistic side, [...]

    17. i had been giving this book years ago by a woman i had worked with. i thought it was strange that she was so adamant about me reading it and i put it on my shelf and completely forgot about it. now that i have time i decided to take a look. i found this book to be surprisingly mysterious and inspirational. this book reads like a journal of an incredible journey one man takes in rediscovering his grandfather as not just a caregiver, but a teacher, and a guide. i really enjoyed the way this book t [...]

    18. I think this book is a piece of crap. Did I say that clearly enough or loud enough for ya'll to hear? I picked it up because the way it was bound and the way it integrated art with literature intrigued me. It's a mystery of sorts, but its the sort of mystery that falls flat on its face when one gets to the end and the author hasn't done a good job of tying all the ends together. If I had to explain the theme in a phrase, I'd say that the author places high value on the concept of the circle of l [...]

    19. As always, Bantock's work is rich and strange, a shifting, hinting puzzle of a story. I didn't enjoy this one as much as some of his other work--perhaps because of the unrelenting male POV, perhaps because I was somehow expecting a different story. Nonetheless, it's an intriguing plot, and as usual one never quite knows how things will turn out. It does have the fun of 3D--there are items that fold out from the pages and have to be opened and examined. I think perhaps this one left a few too man [...]

    20. A great little book about a man who inherits a house in Spain from his artist grandfather. He's also been left a riddle to solve, as in his childhood. Great fun, especially if you are a puzzler. Plus you don't have to do any of the thinking. Lots of art mixed in with the story, mostly modern collage but the author discusses the art as only an artist can. He explains the building of a work which is so very much a part of it's soul. It's a beautiful gift his grandfather has left him, he only has t [...]

    21. Nick Bantock fictional story of a man's spiritual awakening in less than 200 pages. It is a tale that takes place during a nine day visit to Spain with the intention of selling his inheritance, his grandfathers house. Armon Hurt is given a cardboard case full of clues and discovers his belonging, or the sense of being connected to his heritage. As he attempts to solve the riddle, he finds himself, to his amazement and delight, in his grandfather's studio, the Forgetting Room, working on a painti [...]

    22. I found this to be a lovely and engaging book. The marriage of art and literature was wonderful, and I sincerely appreciate Bantock's appreciation and understanding of brevity. In the 105 pages--with graciously spaced text and a variety of pages dedicated solely to art--Bantock delivers a beautiful story that doesn't give any more or any less than that which is completely relevant. This was a very enjoyable and easy read peppered nicely with eloquent statements and profound ideas.

    23. This was an interesting book that combines literature with visual art. I liked the format of how the two were intermingled; I also appreciate the authors appreciation for brevity. He says a lot in so few pages, but, unfortunately, it takes a toll on character development, leaving me with one-dimensional characters that I really could not care less about. In the end, this meant I really didn't care about the ending, which ultimately left me feeling nothing.

    24. Having grown up being entranced by the pictures in the Griffon & Sabine series, I was looking forward to this. Warning: I didn't rush this. I took my time. I looked over the pictures. I pondered over the scenery. I enjoyed reading this. Was it as good as G & S? No, I don't think so. I appreciated that he didn't get too existential with it,though. But I did enjoy stepping into the Forgetting Room for a time.

    25. Um, definitely a unique book - with 'pull-outs' (for lack of a better term) of what Armon found."When his grandfather dies, Armon inherits the family home in Ronda, Spain, and finds himself trying to unravel the surreal conundrum his grandfather has left for him. Armon begins to remember his childhood art lessons, and gradually, as his grandfather's studio takes hold of him, he finds himself pulled, day by day, toward a most extraordinary elliptic link with his past."

    26. Was excited to discover this book since it was set in Andalusia & would be intermixing history and art in the plot. First book by Nick Bantock that I have read so I wasn't expecting the envelopes, foldouts and collages that went along with the text. Enjoyed the story, the character of the grandfather, the talk of deunce(dark spirit of creativity) and the setting but the puzzle left me confused. Short in number of pages but not a quick read.

    27. The thing about many of Nick Bantock's books is that the inclusion of words is a very deliberate thing—they could so easily rest upon his paintings and assemblages alone. So you the reader must pace yourself as you follow the thread of the plot, savor what is said, and meditate on the interior journey his characters take. These are for taking your time with and possibly returning to again.

    28. I am seriously in love with Nick Bantock! I love how he combines art and words to create a true work of art. And wow he is an amazing artist.This book was just as stunning as the Griffin and Sabine story, not told in postcards/letters, but there are still parts to fold out, look at for hours, and then go back and peruse after I finished the book, and understood more of the clues!

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