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Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America

Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth Century America Lillian Faderman tells the compelling story of lesbian life in the th century from the early s to today s diverse lifestyles Using journals unpublished manuscripts songs news accounts novel

  • Title: Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America
  • Author: Lillian Faderman
  • ISBN: 9780140171228
  • Page: 141
  • Format: Paperback
  • Lillian Faderman tells the compelling story of lesbian life in the 20th century, from the early 1900s to today s diverse lifestyles Using journals, unpublished manuscripts, songs, news accounts, novels, medical literature, and numerous interviews, she relates an often surprising narrative of lesbian life A key worke point of reference from which all subsequent studLillian Faderman tells the compelling story of lesbian life in the 20th century, from the early 1900s to today s diverse lifestyles Using journals, unpublished manuscripts, songs, news accounts, novels, medical literature, and numerous interviews, she relates an often surprising narrative of lesbian life A key worke point of reference from which all subsequent studies of 20th century lesbian life in the United States will begin San Francisco Examiner.

    • Ã Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America || î PDF Download by × Lillian Faderman
      141 Lillian Faderman
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      Posted by:Lillian Faderman
      Published :2018-09-27T22:02:52+00:00

    1 thought on “Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America

    1. for all intents and purposes, this is a good, extensively researched book on the history of lesbianism as it stands in the united states (although she does occasionally bring in a bit of history from britain, france and germany). so why three stars? well, there are a few reasons, firstly and mostly to do with personal taste, and secondly to do with tone/inclusivity. but before i delve into all of that, let’s talk about the book itself a little first. i love lillian faderman’s conclusion that [...]

    2. I read this when I was in my early 20's, way before Ellen and Rosie and Margaret Cho and The L Word and Will and Grace were out and about. I was glued to this's amazing to me that now there's an entire gay TV channel. That was unimaginable just 15 years ago. We still have a long way to go, but wow

    3. VERY briefly at the moment, I will say this: Faderman's research is interesting, and the history of lesbianism in the 20th Century US is a good reminder of where we came from (and how far we still have to go). But I take exception to Faderman's suggestion that romantic friends (what women who likely lived as lesbians before the term came into popular usage) were sweet and romantic with each other, but asexual. Despite female socialization, I find it difficult to believe that women who lived toge [...]

    4. I found Faderman to be stuck in middle-class gender biases, which may work for explaining some histories, but left others drenched in rehashed stereotypes.

    5. A history of the emergence of identities and subcultures. Lillian Faderman's political argument is omnipresent, interpreting her source material: to take a random example from early on, she writes about social reformers, "Some of those women were cultural feminists, fueled by their belief that male values created the tragedies connected with industrialization, war, and mindless urbanization and that it was the responsibility of women, with their superior sensibilities, to straighten the world ou [...]

    6. A relatively succinct, yet comprehensive history of lesbian women in America, which also touches on feminism, civil rights and relations between the gay and lesbian communities. As far as I am aware this is the most comprehensive work on lesbian history available. Faderman did extensive research and the book is rife with footnotes and comprised predominately of interviews conducted for this book. Faderman is upfront about her biases, although her disbelief in "congenitalism" may make modern read [...]

    7. This book was awesome--lots of primary sources, very interesting take on the cultural/historical background surrounding 'lesbians.' However, it was stolen along with the rest of the contents in my backpack when I was mugged, and I haven't found another copy--not that I've been looking, admittedly. Want to loan me yours?

    8. This is a FANTASTIC book for any lover of history, especially the history of lesbians in America. The Notes section alone is worth this book's weight in gold.The book chronicles the history of lesbians from the late nineteenth century into the early 90s. Some of the topics include homosexuality in the military and how it was condoned, butch-femme dynamic and how it ruled the working-class lesbian community, lesbian-sexual-radicals of the 70s, and much, much more.Very informative. Very interestin [...]

    9. I can't really recommend this book unless you need it for an academic reason. Faderman's research is excellent, but the writing is sometimes dull and repetitive, so it's not an easy book to read cover-to-cover. More troublesome, her rhetoric is both obvious and extremely dated. The book was originally published in 1991, which should have put her into second-wave feminism, but her reasoning and politics come off as even older than that, and therefore anachronistic and occasionally irritating. In [...]

    10. this book, though incredibly cerebral is super interesting. having been a natural sciences student in school, i missed all the women's studies and gender theory classes. i think this book does a good job on tracing the history of american lesbianism from the 1900s until now.

    11. Examination of the emergence of lesbian lifestyles during the twentieth century. Interesting and incredibly helpful look at the history of American sexuality.

    12. Fantastic book and really insightful. I couldn't put it down. One of the best, if not the best book I have ever read on Lesbian history in the US. A wonderful book!

    13. ODD GIRLS AND TWILIGHT LOVERS: A HISTORY OF LESBIAN LIFE IN 20TH CENTURY AMERICA by Lillian Faderman is a useful but very, very outdated portrayal of the growth and transformation of lesbian subcultures and community from 1900 to 1990. Perhaps one of the reasons it is so outdated reading it now is that it was published in 1991, and that Faderman herself was part of the 1970s movements, which she herself admits in an antidote near the end of the book keeps her from fully realizing the ways the wo [...]

    14. Lillian Faderman's book clearly & elegantly draws together the history of women loving women in the United States. I acquired a new reading list from perusing her endnotes and bibliography! Other readers have pointed out the problematic parts of Faderman's work--her focus on white women's experiences at the expense of marginalized communities-- but overall this book is a valuable academic & personal resource. It is lovely to be able to refer people to such a scholarly yet accessible work [...]

    15. A decade-by-decade history of lesbian history and culture in the 20th century. I found it really refreshing (especially at the time -- about 15 years ago) that this history doesn't tell lesbians' stories in the context of the gay men that lived at the time. The oral histories offer insights that are, as far as I know, unique to this book. Only moderately dry in a few spots; generally very interesting and well paced. Great photos.

    16. A stellar, engrossing read. 70s lesbian-feminism and 50s bar culture are here sometimes simplified to the point of cartoonishness (and perhaps also 19th century "romantic friendships"?), though I'm not sure that was entirely avoidable in so sweeping an overview. Overall, though, Faderman has done an excellent job of enlivening the history of lesbian life in America, providing an essential backbone for pursuing more specialized areas of study.

    17. This was pretty interesting, especially the oral history interviews with women who lived as lesbians in the 1940s and 1950s. The chapter on bisexuality/lesbianism in Harlem during the 1920s was also fascinating. Except for that chapter and the chapter on the 1970s, the author focused primarily on white women, which seemed like a missed opportunity.

    18. Lillian Faderman presents an accessible, thorough look at the development of lesbian consciousness and life during the 21st century (in the U.S.). She further informs the text with a review of romantic friendship and the cultural constraints on women during the 20th century. I couldn't put it down and recommend it to anyone with an interest in women's history.

    19. Even though there was alot left to be desired.cially in the realm of history relating to more marginalized communitiesis was a good and informative read. I realize that one book cant cover everything, and that sometimes I shouldnt judge based on if my own reality is reflectedRead it if you can

    20. Fantastic review of lesbian culture in the twentieth century. Extremely informative and helped to teach me how so much of lesbian culture has infiltrated into popular culture. Good read for sure!

    21. Faderman is a great historian. Her writing can be clunky at times and her biases can be grating, but it was very informative.

    22. A fascinating lens into American cultural history. I especially liked the insights into how women's colleges shaped the women's settlement movement.

    23. I lost my steam most of the way through. it's a quite exhaustive history of lesbians in the US. it was written in the 90s so in a number of respects you have to account for how terminology has evolved since then. partially I couldn't get into this bc I've just read so many lesbian memoirs the past few years that reading a dry history like this sucked up any kind of feelings of queer magic or sentimentality. or maybe it's that contradictions that existed throughout the many iterations of lesbian [...]

    24. What a comprehensive history of lesbians! While sometimes dry, Faderman was good about detailing lesbian progress without adopting too-overtly problematic diction. Obviously, when you're talking about 1920s lesbians, you're going to have to talk about how lesbianism was seen as a disorder/illness/disease, which isn't the case now, but there's a good way to do this, and then there's a bad way to do this that adopts the rhetoric of the past, and Faderman was excellent about remaining impartial to [...]

    25. Dated now (1991 seems like FOREVER ago, even though it was in my lifetime!) but fascinating.My favorite parts were the quotes from all of Faderman's interviews. I would definitely read a book with just those collected interviews.I did find the absence of transgender women to be troubling. And Faderman's insistence that almost all lesbians aren't 'born that way' doesn't really fit with my own experiences.

    26. More accurately 3.5 stars.I'd been meaning to read this book for a long time. Being a lesbian is a weird thing because it doesn't come from your family, and it's not something you hear much about in general society/education. There's all this history to this part of you that you have to search out, read from books like this. I have a lot of trouble with deciding how I feel about this history, which both is and is not my history. (It is because I am a lesbian and this history has shaped the socie [...]

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