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Life in the Iron Mills and Other Stories

Life in the Iron Mills and Other Stories You must read this book and let your heart be broken New York Times Book Review One of the earliest recognitions in American literature of the existence of the very poor Michele Murray National Obser

  • Title: Life in the Iron Mills and Other Stories
  • Author: Rebecca Harding Davis Tillie Olsen
  • ISBN: 9780935312393
  • Page: 476
  • Format: Paperback
  • You must read this book and let your heart be broken New York Times Book Review One of the earliest recognitions in American literature of the existence of the very poor Michele Murray, National ObserverSuggested for course use in 19th century U.S literatureWorking class studies Rebecca Harding Davis 1831 1910 published 12 books and many serialized novels, stories, anYou must read this book and let your heart be broken New York Times Book Review One of the earliest recognitions in American literature of the existence of the very poor Michele Murray, National ObserverSuggested for course use in 19th century U.S literatureWorking class studies Rebecca Harding Davis 1831 1910 published 12 books and many serialized novels, stories, and essays.

    • µ Life in the Iron Mills and Other Stories || ✓ PDF Read by Ü Rebecca Harding Davis Tillie Olsen
      476 Rebecca Harding Davis Tillie Olsen
    • thumbnail Title: µ Life in the Iron Mills and Other Stories || ✓ PDF Read by Ü Rebecca Harding Davis Tillie Olsen
      Posted by:Rebecca Harding Davis Tillie Olsen
      Published :2019-01-26T03:48:38+00:00

    1 thought on “Life in the Iron Mills and Other Stories

    1. "Life in the Iron Mills" (1861) was one of the first major Realist works in American literature and created an immediate sensation in the literary world when it was first published, though it was subsequently forgotten and only re-discovered in relatively recent times by editor Olsen. I'd read, and really liked, it already back in the 90s, when we were home-schooling our girls and I was preparing to teach American literature (I made it required reading!). Since the additional material in this vo [...]

    2. This debut novella by Rebecca Harding Davis, first published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1861, is now a classic after its rescue from oblivion by Tillie Olsen and the Feminist Press in the 1970s. An early example of realism in American fiction, which had been in the mid-19th century dominated by variations of romance (e.g Hawthorne) and sentimentalism (e.g Stowe), Harding's story has since earned comparison with Zola, Tolstoy, and Dreiser for its grim, detailed portrayal of laboring life. It is t [...]

    3. Very strong and moving story. I read some parts of it aloud because I had trouble focusing at times. Some of the language is quaint or in dialect. But Davis illuminates the horrors and impotence of being trapped in poverty when your whole soul wants to take flight, but can't. She exposes graphically how factory workers are only part of the machinery in the eyes of the owners. A wrencher.I read most of the biographical chapter by Tillie Olsen, which was quite interesting. Davis was so famous for [...]

    4. Fairly interesting reading for those interested in the actuality of events. The lives described are mostly brutal and dumb, with a casual cruelty and disgusting habits. I'm not a huge fan of her style, it almost seems condescending to me. The critical notes by Tillie Olsen were top notch.

    5. I read this book in my Writing 1010 class, and my teacher was not the best lecturer on the book. That being said, I did enjoy the story of Life, just not the time we spent in class talking about it. I would have given this book a 5/5 if I had read it on my own, but ya, I didn't. Anyway, I strongly recommend this book. Rebecca Harding Davis is considered the first author to use realism, and what better way to learn what realism is than by seeing the original definition?So all in all, great story, [...]

    6. In cleaning through my apartment I have found an old treasure-trove of book related papers, including my “books read” list from 1999-2000. In addition to listing the books, I wrote about 2-3 sentences to myself – sometimes they were plot reminders, sometimes commentary on the books. They were not intended to be read by anyone other than myself. I don’t imagine these will be very helpful to anyone else, but I’m posting them here for two reasons: first, to keep my reviews/comments in one [...]

    7. Depressing, certainly. But the novella that is "Life in the Iron Mills" (it's about 54 pages long in this edition) is beautifully written. The smoke and soot of the town is described so artfully, yellow river and all, that I found myself reading those descriptive passages over again aloud. The working class was shafted big time in the 19th century, and this story captures the horror of it. Read it!

    8. A working class woman escapes her class by becoming a writer with the excellent title novella. The other stories are less accomplished but professional, which the introduction explains is the result of having to depend on her pen as the family's means of support.Well worth reading as access to an era of exploitation that seems distant but which continues to carry echoes into the present.

    9. Life in the Iron Mills is wonderful but the other two stories are weighed down by their happy endings (which Olsen addresses). The biographical interpretation is interesting in concept (as much as art reflecting life reflecting art can be) but was mostly tedious.

    10. I had to read this for my American Literature class, and it's probably my favorite book I've ever been assigned. Powerful and poignant the entire way through. I loved everything from the heartbreaking story to the way Davis wrote. It's now one of my all-time favorite books.

    11. With the recent mine disasters, this book is worth reading or teaching. How many books imagine or describe the life of iron workers? Reading it well can transform a student's perspective on poverty and oppression.

    12. Ellen I found this difficult to read, but was amazed at the emotional reactions I had to it. Not a book I will forget.

    13. I read "Life in the Iron Mills" from an anthology (i.e. not this edition) and quite enjoyed it. Glad that Rebecca Harding Davis was rediscovered and brought back into syllabi.

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