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Yoga: Discipline of Freedom: The Yoga Sutra Attributed to Patanjali

Yoga Discipline of Freedom The Yoga Sutra Attributed to Patanjali Dating from about the third century A D the Yoga Sutra distills the essence of the physical and spiritual discipline of yoga into fewer than two hundred brief aphorisms It is the core text for any stu

  • Title: Yoga: Discipline of Freedom: The Yoga Sutra Attributed to Patanjali
  • Author: Barbara Stoler Miller Njali Pata
  • ISBN: 9780553374285
  • Page: 488
  • Format: Paperback
  • Dating from about the third century A.D the Yoga Sutra distills the essence of the physical and spiritual discipline of yoga into fewer than two hundred brief aphorisms It is the core text for any study of meditative practice, revered for centuries for its brilliant analysis of mental states and of the process by which inner liberation is achieved Yet its difficultiesDating from about the third century A.D the Yoga Sutra distills the essence of the physical and spiritual discipline of yoga into fewer than two hundred brief aphorisms It is the core text for any study of meditative practice, revered for centuries for its brilliant analysis of mental states and of the process by which inner liberation is achieved Yet its difficulties are legendary, and until now, no translation has made it fully accessible This new translation, hailed by Yoga Journal for its unsurpassed readability, is by one of the leading Sanskrit scholars of our time, whose Bhagavad Gita has become a recognized classic It includes an introduction to the philosophy and psychology underlying the Yoga Sutra, the full text with explanatory commentary, and a glossary of key terms in Sanskrit and English.

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      488 Barbara Stoler Miller Njali Pata
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      Posted by:Barbara Stoler Miller Njali Pata
      Published :2019-03-19T23:20:20+00:00

    1 thought on “Yoga: Discipline of Freedom: The Yoga Sutra Attributed to Patanjali

    1. I've read Patanjali's Yoga Sutras two times cover to cover. The first time I read it I had been doing yoga for five years and I stopped after reading the book and did not pick up my practice again for two and a half years. The second time I read it I was practicing again and I did not stop my practice. "Yoga" comes from the Sanskrit verb "Yuj." Sanskrit being the Mama of Indo-European/Indo-Iranian languages gives us a cognate of the word in our own language "yoke." Indeed, that is what the pract [...]

    2. Miller, Barbara Stoler. Yoga: Discipline of Freedom: The Yoga Sutra Attributed to Patanjali (1995) ****Excellent for a first readingThe main strength of this book is in the late Professor Miller's Introduction which is lucid and insightful in identifying and placing Patanjali's Yoga Sutras for the general reader. The weakness is in Miller's use of certain non-yogic and sometimes misleading terms in her translation, usage which stems from her position as an academic of yoga and not a practitioner [...]

    3. Very hard book to get through. Ancient and allusive, has been debated for a loooong time, but still a yoga must-read. I enjoyed the translator's discussion of the rationale behind the yamas & niyamas. The more I learn of yogic philosophy, the more it reaffirms my own faith in my own beliefs in a very positive & complimentary way.

    4. Growing up in western society played a large role in my reading experience. Eastern thought of the goal of losing oneselves to find integration with God is an idea that I still do not understand. It was a good learning experience to find that Hinduism is not so much a hippie, love all, pacifism religion, but is very complex and deep. I know each after a three week study on this topic I've still barely scratched the surface.Also yoga, as a means of meditation, prayer, and worship is a new concept [...]

    5. This is the first book I have read of the Yoga Sutra. Although I have attended countless yoga classes and have a nice little yoga home video library, it was nice to read what this phenomenon called yoga is primarily aimed to achieve. I knew it had more to do with posture and breathing, those are just a means to an end in enlightenment, and that each asana involves not only the physically body but the mental and spiritual as well. It is the acknowledgement of spirit playing a central part in yoga [...]

    6. excellent translation and very useful notes on each line. plus some great stories about the powers of adept yogis. there is one mention of the word "atom" which i really wish had been explained in some footnote - i can't imagine there was a word for the basic molecular building block in sanscrit. but patanjali does seem to know everything, so maybe i'm wrong there. nice commentary on yoga's similarities and variations on ancient buddhist doctrine that was being developed at the same time. it's s [...]

    7. I struggled with this short summary of the Sutras. I think Miller did little to identify Classical Yoga's philosophy and method in the context of the greater conversation of yoga (about this particular text). My opinion is that the recitation of this Sutra is most useful for inspiring faith within the practitioner, and considering the brevity of Disciplineand emphasis on Miller's translation (rather than commentary) this text could be used for just that. -1 for no original Sanskrit.

    8. A clear and concise translation with just enough commentary to flesh out the short but often obscure aphorisms. It's not a technical or academic treatment, but the commentary serves as a good jumping off point if you want to get into the deeper philosophical stuff. If you've already read the Sankhya karikas and are looking for a more rigorous connection with the Yoga Sutra you'll have to turn elsewhere. Miller's translation is an excellent way to get started though.

    9. I had to read this for my World's Religions class. having taken a yoga class I did find this text interesting. But at the same time it was hard for me to keep awake reading this, ans I feel like that had to do with Miller's commentary - it was a bit dense. All in all, though, this was a quick, interesting read.

    10. Spoiler alert. I think this last line of Yoga Discipline of Freedom really sums up the point to the yoga sutras. "In a real sense Patanjali has established what it means in terms of yoga for one's spirit to achieve its true identity as observer to the world - a witness rather than a suffering participant in a world of ceaseless volatile change." -Patanjali, Yoga, Discipline of Freedom.

    11. Miller's introduction and commentary are very helpful - although I obviously can't comment on the quality of the translation, her explanation of the nuances and polyvalence of particular terms and their possible translations is very thorough and interesting. A great way into understanding Patanjali's text.

    12. I think I would have enjoyed this more if I practiced yoga. As it is, I basically speed-read the book so I could count it as "read" before selling it back to the bookstore. I would have probably gotten more out of it had I taken my time.

    13. This translation is so much more accessible than some of the myriad of translations out there. I browsed several different copies in the used bookstore and no two translations were the same. Each translator puts their own spin on Patanjali's spartan sanskrit. This one resonated with me.

    14. I read this for a class.This is a decent translation with a good format, but the content just isn't my thing, honestly.

    15. I enjoyed the introduction and commentary given by Miller. A great book that has a lot to offer those who study it.

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