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Letters of T.S. Eliot: 1898-1922

Letters of T S Eliot Eliot s correspondence from his childhood in St Louis until he had settled in England and published The Waste Land Edited and with an Introduction by Valerie Eliot Index photographs

  • Title: Letters of T.S. Eliot: 1898-1922
  • Author: T.S. Eliot Valerie Eliot
  • ISBN: 9780156508506
  • Page: 115
  • Format: paper
  • Eliot s correspondence from his childhood in St Louis until he had settled in England and published The Waste Land Edited and with an Introduction by Valerie Eliot Index photographs.

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      Posted by:T.S. Eliot Valerie Eliot
      Published :2018-04-15T16:50:42+00:00

    1 thought on “Letters of T.S. Eliot: 1898-1922

    1. Of course Eliot would have opined that most letters should be burnt rather than slid into a postal bin, but those who love his work will glory in Yale’s recent publication of both volumes. While I found William Logan’s review in the NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW (nytimes/2011/10/02/boo) rather sniffy--Logan suggested I substitute the word “spiffy,” but that’s for readers to decide--we agree that the frighteningly erudite but amusing Eliot would have been welcome at our dinner tables anyti [...]

    2. Reading the letters of T.S. Eliot, or anyone's letters provided they are not an utterly boring person, famous or not, is fascinating. It's rather like being a Peeping Tom. Or should I say a "Peeping T." Sorry. Terrible joke. On to the review.On the front of this book, there is a blurb by the Boston Globe that reads, "A joy to read they reveal the man for good and ill." I was about halfway through when I realized that there is much more of the "for good" than the for "ill," unless "ill" literally [...]

    3. For many years, THE WASTE LAND seemed the perfect New Critical text-as-verbal-icon - allusion, paradox. irony. and most important, impersonality had them all and to spare. Yet after 20 years of scholarship devoted to explicating the poem's various references to Jacobean drama, folklore, quest legend, comparative religion and Greek myth, it was an essay by Randall Jarrell, not only the student of one of the New Criticism's best practitioners. John Crowe Ransom, but also trained in psychology, whi [...]

    4. Having done extensive study of Eliot's work, thirty years ago, I have felt like I should go back at some point and meet the man himself. Reading these letters has been a very interesting way to return to TSE, and connect with him a little more intimately, free from the inevitable heavy hand of the biographer. Naturally, in letters there is more of a self-consciousness, a false self which arises and tries to impress the reader. One must be like a daddy long legs, standing above the depths, observ [...]

    5. T.S. Eliot is the best of correspondents. He is intelligent, witty, seemingly sincere, gracious, kind. I enjoyed his letters. I don't, however, know if I'd have liked him in person, IRL. He comes across to me as cheap, ambitious, avaricious. My impression, of course, could be wrong, but he seems to use people; any friend, any connection, no matter how slight, is fair game to get what he wants. I expected him to be a "momma's boy" and he was, but I was surprised by just how much he expected his f [...]

    6. All too often personal letters have no innate merit, obviously published only because of the fame won the author by his more carefully composed, revised and selected works. That is clearly not the case here. Every few sentences there was one I wanted to pull out and trot all over the internet. Or maybe make a magnet. Or a bumper sticker. No, too literate and soul-solidifying for a bumper sticker. Might cause accidents.

    7. Autobiography in its rawest form. There is something harsh and beautiful to flip through someone's old letters, seeing what they want to communicate about themselves. I've been a big fan of Eliot's poetry. I'm now being drawn to his critical work. Bits and pieces of that appear in the letters, as well as the ongoing battles of London literary society. Its not for everyone

    8. If you like Eliot, you will love getting more insight into his character and life via these letters to and from his friends. I can't understand half of Eliot's poems but am fascinated by him as a person and loved this book.

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