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Science vs. Religion: What Scientists Really Think

Science vs Religion What Scientists Really Think That the longstanding antagonism between science and religion is irreconcilable has been taken for granted And in the wake of recent controversies over teaching intelligent design and the ethics of st

  • Title: Science vs. Religion: What Scientists Really Think
  • Author: Elaine Howard Ecklund
  • ISBN: 9780195392982
  • Page: 498
  • Format: Hardcover
  • That the longstanding antagonism between science and religion is irreconcilable has been taken for granted And in the wake of recent controversies over teaching intelligent design and the ethics of stem cell research, the divide seems as unbridgeable as ever.In Science vs Religion, Elaine Howard Ecklund investigates this unexamined assumption in the first systematic studThat the longstanding antagonism between science and religion is irreconcilable has been taken for granted And in the wake of recent controversies over teaching intelligent design and the ethics of stem cell research, the divide seems as unbridgeable as ever.In Science vs Religion, Elaine Howard Ecklund investigates this unexamined assumption in the first systematic study of what scientists actually think and feel about religion In the course of her research, Ecklund surveyed nearly 1,700 scientists and interviewed 275 of them She finds that most of what we believe about the faith lives of elite scientists is wrong Nearly 50 percent of them are religious Many others are what she calls spiritual entrepreneurs, seeking creative ways to work with the tensions between science and faith outside the constraints of traditional religion The book centers around vivid portraits of 10 representative men and women working in the natural and social sciences at top American research universities Ecklund s respondents run the gamut from Margaret, a chemist who teaches a Sunday school class, to Arik, a physicist who chose not to believe in God well before he decided to become a scientist Only a small minority are actively hostile to religion Ecklund reveals how scientists believers and skeptics alike are struggling to engage the increasing number of religious students in their classrooms and argues that many scientists are searching for boundary pioneers to cross the picket lines separating science and religion.With broad implications for education, science funding, and the thorny ethical questions surrounding stem cell research, cloning, and other cutting edge scientific endeavors, Science vs Religion brings a welcome dose of reality to the science and religion debates.

    Science vs Religion What Scientists Really Think Elaine Science vs Religion What Scientists Really Think Elaine Howard Ecklund on FREE shipping on qualifying offers That the longstanding antagonism between science and religion is irreconcilable has been taken for granted And in the wake of recent controversies over teaching intelligent design and the ethics of stem cell research Relationship between religion and science Various aspects of the relationship between religion and science have been cited by modern historians of science and religion, philosophers, theologians, scientists, and others from various geographical regions and cultures Even though the ancient and medieval worlds did not have conceptions resembling the modern understandings of science and religion, certain elements of these Conflicts agreements between science and religion This section looks at the conflicts between the truth claims of science and religion It also describes attempts to evaluate religion by using scientific methods and vice versa. Conflict thesis The conflict thesis is a historiographical approach in the history of science which maintains that there is an intrinsic intellectual conflict between religion and science and that the relationship between religion and science inevitably leads to hostility examples to support this thesis have commonly been drawn from the relations between science and religion in Western Europe. ReasonFaithScience Religion, Science, and the Epiphany One of the truths that is manifested on Epiphany that s what the word epiphania means is the compatibility of faith and reason, of religion and science The Magi were scientists, astronomers interested in tracking and measuring the heavenly bodies. Are Science Religion at War Video Interview Series Are Science Religion at War What is it about science and theology that grips people so emotionally, as during a war, such that each is committed to his or her viewpoint which often are sharply opposed to one another Are Science and Religion in Conflict BQO We can divide this question into three components First, do people generally believe that science and religion are in conflict Second, does the historical record suggest an enduring or inevitable clash between science and religion Why Mainstream Science is a Religion The Freedom Articles Science is a Religion Going Back to Athens Materialism vs Idealism This is certainly not the first time we have struggled with the debate of whether the world can best be described by materialism.The ancient Greek philosophers and scientists thought long and hard about the issue.Materialism vs. Overview Where science and religion conflict Science is ultimately based on observation of nature Scientists assume that things happen because of natural causes Some scientists do not believe in the existence of one or Gods or Goddesses. Muslim Views on Religion, Science and Popular Culture Aug , The survey asked Muslims about their views on various dimensions of contemporary life Muslims see few tensions between their faith and life in the modern

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      498 Elaine Howard Ecklund
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    1 thought on “Science vs. Religion: What Scientists Really Think

    1. In this book sociologist Elaine Ecklund does a large study with 1000 scientists at elite universities including personal interviews with 250. The fact that this is such a massive study should be commended. The reason I only give this 3 stars has nothing to do with her methodology, which seems to be rather solid to me, but because the results are so uninteresting. I didn't learn anything new about the attitudes of scientists from this. IT has already been establishesd through polls that most scie [...]

    2. I will start by admitting that I know the author and she is now someone I would consider a good friend. This book is the culmination of a five year project to survey scientists about their religious beliefs. Ecklund surveys over 1700 scientists from elite universities, followed by over 200 person interviews to determine whether scientists are religious. Results show a large percentage of scientists as "spirtual athetists" which is a unique finding since athetists population in mainstream is rath [...]

    3. I think Ecklund has advanced the discussion of science and religion through this book. It's the most comprehensive sociological survey to date of what scientists really think about religion. It's very much worth reading if you work in or around the academic science community. My biggest critique is that Ecklund lumps together natural scientists with social scientists. But there's a huge difference in methodology and underlying assumptions between these professionals. So IMHO it would have been b [...]

    4. Presenting the findings from a study between 2005 - 2008, through interviews and surveys on various elite scientists belonging to top research universities in the US on the role of religion in academia and world of science, it contains some fascinating statistics and comments from closeted faithfuls to hardcore secularists. Typically antagonising over darwism vs intelligent design, scientists are having to deal with religious-based questions in class while coping with highly critical colleagues [...]

    5. This was interesting off and on, but Ecklund was too redundant. This already-short book should have been half as long as it turned out to be.

    6. This study, sponsored by the Templeton Foundation, revealed some interesting results, as did the writer's interviews that revealed that the tension between science and religion exists in more shades of grey than in black or white. Other than that, though, this was a monotonous read for the most part and read more like a dissertation. The one other thing I will say in the book's defense is that it doesn't deserve all of the mudslinging it has gotten on its page. One-star reviews accusing it of t [...]

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