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Nomad Codes: Adventures in Modern Esoterica

Nomad Codes Adventures in Modern Esoterica In these wide ranging essays Erik Davis explores the codes spiritual cultural and embodied that people use to escape the limitations of their lives and enrich their experience of the world These in

  • Title: Nomad Codes: Adventures in Modern Esoterica
  • Author: Erik Davis Susan Willmarth
  • ISBN: 9781891241543
  • Page: 434
  • Format: Paperback
  • In these wide ranging essays, Erik Davis explores the codes spiritual, cultural, and embodied that people use to escape the limitations of their lives and enrich their experience of the world These include Asian religious traditions and West African trickster gods, Western occult and esoteric lore, postmodern theory and psychedelic science, as well as festival scenesIn these wide ranging essays, Erik Davis explores the codes spiritual, cultural, and embodied that people use to escape the limitations of their lives and enrich their experience of the world These include Asian religious traditions and West African trickster gods, Western occult and esoteric lore, postmodern theory and psychedelic science, as well as festival scenes such as Burning Man Whether his subject is collage art or the magickal realism of H P Lovecraft, Davis writes with keen yet skeptical sympathy, intellectual subtlety and wit, and unbridled curiosity The common thread running through these pieces is what Davis calls modern esoterica, which he describes as a no man s land located somewhere between anthropology and mystical pulp, between the zendo and the metal club, between cultural criticism and extraordinary experience Such an ambiguous and startling landscape demands that the intrepid adventurer shed any territorial claims and go nomad.

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      434 Erik Davis Susan Willmarth
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      Posted by:Erik Davis Susan Willmarth
      Published :2018-012-21T01:22:45+00:00

    1 thought on “Nomad Codes: Adventures in Modern Esoterica

    1. This is another case of a beautifully unclassifiable book; baffling to marketers and bookstore shelvers, a marvelous revelation to those of us whose minds work like an ever-evolving kaleidoscope of ecletctic quirkiness. It would be shameful to pigeon-hole Davis' essays into a bucket or even to imply that each has a definite "subject". That's not to say that they are incoherent, no, quite the contrary! They are just . . . shifty . . . and very, very interesting. Erik Davis' interests are, as the [...]

    2. This book is hard to classify. The majority of this work is a fantastic collection of essays on fringe experience, esoteric thought, and how one views/classifies ideas about the universe. Much of the rest of the title is a schizophrenic collection of obscure references that left this reader feeling a bit lost. Of course, there were nuggets mined out of the obscurity, but it's as if one must have already been steeped in the same type of intellectual gravy as Davis to fully appreciate those partic [...]

    3. These were very cool essays on various sub cultures and obscure musicians and spiritual seekers. I especially enjoyed the reporting on the morphing rave scene in India and the scraggly characters that have stuck around way past their expiration date. Also liked the portrait of a bizarro psycho-surf band, the Sun City Girls, and the method to their madness. The description of Burning Man brought back memories. Don't we all wish we could conjure our travel experiences with such immediacy, precisio [...]

    4. Maybe my favorite book of the year. Davis did the Zep 33 1/3, has written for Arthur, Salon, etc and actually can discuss music, fandom, spirituality, sexuality, drugs, and politics all equally well (and tied together). Yeti following up their Luc Sante compilation with this is like saying, "Estey, just start mailing us checks every month for being the most ace publisher." I'll be living off the glow from this till the Ellen Willis anthology comes out next year, and further blows my mind.

    5. Struggled with giving the whole collection a high mark Really it does vary, but some sections really stood out, particular Inner Spaces. Especially in this section, the guy weaves a mad brain basket of religious, spiritual and existential matters. Like no writing I've come across before; a really strangely refreshing point of view on matters of the mind. It does appear a bit pretentious at points, but he's self-aware and just stating his vocabutastic case as it is.

    6. A few of the essays in this collection were fantastic. And let me just say that this book is brimming with bits of information: people, places, and things that I constantly had to look up. That's putting it lightly. This book is over-saturated with googleable entries. Taken piecemeal, and slow, I might recommend this collection from Davis, an author who seems to be equal parts stoner, nerd, adventurer, and philosopher. I don't want to fault the guy because I'm too stupid to know what he's talkin [...]

    7. This book is a compilation of essays by a modern-day, less (though by no means un-) drug-addled Hunter S. Thompson. If you've read HST you'd probably like Mr. Davis. The book covers a wide range of topics, from Klingons to Burning Man, by way of H.P. Lovecraft and Philip K. Dick. If you know seven things about all four of those, I'd guess you'll like this book. If you know zero to one thing about them, I'd guess maybe not. Like Thompson, Davis's prose is best read quickly, almost in a contest to [...]

    8. I am jealous of Erik Davis. We seem to have the same intererests and fascinations, though he writes about them in a way I always wish I had. Nomad Codes is a collection of essays and articles about such topics as Burning Man, western esoteric thought, H.P Lovecraft, Philip K. Dick, Terrence McKenna, psychedelica, Goa trance, Balinese transvestites and more. Nomad Codes is an exploration of the borders of consciousness and society and well worth a read.

    9. Erik Davis (who I must disclose is a friend) writes about modern culture from the perspective of the way too intelligent stoner, but he's never snobby or inaccessible. His travel stories in this book as a globetrotting roving eyeball show a world in the throes of a rapid evolution, summoning the ancient rites of a lost culture within the deep beats of a beach party on Goa. Google him he is a great voice.

    10. This was a really great collection of writing. If you are interested in other cultures, esoteric religions or cults, underground culture and or the effects of technology, it's definitely worth a read. It is an anthology of sorts, so it's easy to pick up/put down. Highly recommended.

    11. A decent collection of Erik Davis ephemera. Good stuff on West Coast assemblage and some Spicer/Duncan musings. I still prefer VISIONARY STATE, but rambled through this pretty quickly.

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