- Books

Royal Flash

Royal Flash A sua cobardia s compar vel sua cara de pau Harry Flashman tem tudo para ser o maior her i do Imp rio Brit nico E esta a sua odisseia Dos sal es vitorianos de Londres s fronteiras ex ticas do Imp rio

  • Title: Royal Flash
  • Author: George MacDonald Fraser
  • ISBN: 9789896372774
  • Page: 429
  • Format: Paperback
  • A sua cobardia s compar vel sua cara de pau Harry Flashman tem tudo para ser o maior her i do Imp rio Brit nico E esta a sua odisseia Dos sal es vitorianos de Londres s fronteiras ex ticas do Imp rio, prepare se para conhecer o maior her i do seu tempo raios, de todos os tempos Ap s o seu regresso do Afeganist o como her i de guerra, Flashman v se envolvido coA sua cobardia s compar vel sua cara de pau Harry Flashman tem tudo para ser o maior her i do Imp rio Brit nico E esta a sua odisseia Dos sal es vitorianos de Londres s fronteiras ex ticas do Imp rio, prepare se para conhecer o maior her i do seu tempo raios, de todos os tempos Ap s o seu regresso do Afeganist o como her i de guerra, Flashman v se envolvido com a bela e perigosa Lola Montez e o mal volo Otto Von Bismarck numa batalha de engenhos que ir decidir o destino de um continente Dando in cio a uma aventura pica, o nosso gal embrulha se numa sucess o desesperada de fugas, disfarces, encontros amorosos e combates singulares que atravessam os sal es de jogo e masmorras de Londres para culminar nas salas de trono da Europa Ser que os talentos de Flashman ir o salvar o nosso sortudo cobarde das garras de Otto Von Bismarck e da bela Lola Montez

    • [PDF] Download ↠ Royal Flash | by Ü George MacDonald Fraser
      429 George MacDonald Fraser
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ↠ Royal Flash | by Ü George MacDonald Fraser
      Posted by:George MacDonald Fraser
      Published :2018-06-09T09:38:55+00:00

    1 thought on “Royal Flash

    1. Last week I finally got around to reading Les Trois Mousquetaires, and this week, more or less by accident, I read Royal Flash. They're both excellent historical thrillers, and it's interesting to compare them. MacDonald Fraser is following very much in Dumas's footsteps. He takes real historical events from the mid-19th century, and recasts them so that history is no longer an inevitable unfolding of grand themes, but rather a haphazard collection of accidents, more often than not turning on wh [...]

    2. Sir Harry Flashman, highly decorated officer of the 11th Light Dragoons, is a cad, a chauvinist, a misogynist, an adulterer, and most of all a coward. His positive qualities consist of having a natural gift for foreign tongues (in this case this can be interpreted as a double entendre ), being a good rider, and having a strong sword arm. What lacks is character. His 'achievements' in his military enterprises are mostly due to either blind luck, running away from danger, a talent for snatching gl [...]

    3. For you poor folks who have never heard of the Flashman series, they tell the story of your classic Victorian adventurer, a man who travels through many lands, making his way by his wits and his skill and always being drawn into the dangers of politics, secret plots, and local politics. But the hero of these stories comes with a twist: he's an awful cad who lies, cheats, and steals his way through the world, a coward who only survives by the skin of his teeth, but who pretends the role of the br [...]

    4. I didn’t like Royal Flash quite as much as the first book in the series, probably because this is the lone Flashman novel set in a fictional location (instead of throwing Flashy directly into real-world events). The Flashman books work (at least for me) on three different levels: there’s the adventure, the humor, and the historical fiction. The third element is a bit lacking due to the make-believe setting Flashman spends much of the book running around in. That doesn’t mean that there are [...]

    5. I have read a number of Flashman books before this one and usually in a series you get ones that are stellar and ones that just don't have that same spark.I felt so-so about this one. It just didn't seem to have the same sparkle.My forever favourite is still Flashman at the Charge. It was also the first one I ever read, and it was a revelation.I adore the Flashman character even when I dislike him.He is a character I at once love/hate. He's such a product of his age (Victorian), and has all the [...]

    6. It took me a long while to get into Royal Flash. It's written from the perspective of Harry Flashman, a cowardly, selfish, mysoginistic bully who is perfectly happy to take credit for anything he hasn't earned and driven largely by his lust. A classic anti-hero and not an easy character for me to relate to at all.However it was highly recommended and I enjoyed the way the tawdry historical references (of the sort you never find in school history books) were woven so intrinsically into the story, [...]

    7. Having enjoyed 'Flashman' (The Flashman Papers, #1), I was keen to read more tales of Flashy, the unabashed racist, scoundrel, bully, cad and coward. George MacDonald Fraser continues his literary conceit that what we are reading is the second part of a cache of papers, written by Flashman in old age (between 1900 and 1905). The second pack of papers is detailed in Royal Flash (The Flashman Papers, #2) and our disreputable hero tangles with femme fatale Lola Montez, and Otto Von Bismarck, amongs [...]

    8. Originally published on my blog here in July 1999.The second of Fraser's Flashman series, Royal Flash is a spoof on Anthony Hope's classic The Prisoner of Zenda. It keeps fairly faithfully to the plot of Hope's novel, with the central part falling to the cowardly Flashman rather than the gallant Rudolf Rassendyll.The major change made by Fraser is the motivation for the escapade. Flashman has no liking for adventure, and it requires both blackmail and force to get him to imitate Prince Carl Gust [...]

    9. Royal Flash is the 2nd book in the Flashman series by George MacDonald Fraser. This story was used for the movie (1975) starring Malcolm McDowell as the irrepressible Harry Flashman. The book was first published in 970.Flashman is one of those heroes / anti-heroes like Sharpe and Horatio Hornblower. The difference is that Flashman is a rogue and a coward always looking out for number 1, AKA himself. In Royal Flash, a dalliance he has with an Irish beauty, during which he also meets Otto von Bism [...]

    10. Of course, you know what you are going to get in series books like this. An exact replica but set in a different location.Flashman is back from the afgan war a hero. In an escape from a london whorehouse, he take refuge in a police chase by hiding in the carriage of Lola Montez - who is entertaining Otto Von Bismark. You can guess what happens here.Otto and Flashy meet up again, where flashy gets his revenge on him by organising an exhibition bout against a top puglist and his affair with Lola b [...]

    11. Flashman's character is becoming more cohesive in this book. I felt that in the 1st book Fraser didn't quite know how to handle his creation, and Flashman fluctuated between being a cad and an outright unlikeable bastard. This time he's a coward, sure, and a bully if he sees the chance, and of course if you put a skirt on a hay bale then he'd probably sleep with it, but he still never dips below likeable scoundrel. A few slow points where Fraser dips a bit too far into the history aspect, but mu [...]

    12. What can I say ? If you like your main character to be a rake, a fake and a coward then the Flashman series is the books for you. In the second book, the Flashman focuses on one particular fling with a woman of amazing talents, and how his dealings with her led him to adventures in the attempt to unite Germany by impersonating a Royal Dane. Great stuff. On to Book 3.

    13. From BBC Radio 4 Extra:Celebrated cavalry officer, Harry Flashman is caught with his trousers down in a London club. Read by Iain Cuthbertson.

    14. Just as good as the first! I like everything about Flashman so far, whether he's cowering his way through Afghanistan or getting shanghaied by Otto von Bismarck into some madcap scheme in Denmark. Recommended to anyone who has a sense of humor.

    15. “I was sufficiently recovered from my nervous condition – or else the booze was beginning to work Royal Flash is the second of the Flashman novels. Written in 1970 by George MacDonald Fraser, Fraser based the book on the plot of The Prisoner of Zenda. Set during the Revolutions of 1848 the story is amusing enough. It is set in the fictional Duchy of Strackenz. This makes it the only Flashman novel to be set in a fictitious location. The story sees Flashman (view spoiler)[fleeing from a polic [...]

    16. I can see why people would like this. Harry Flashman is a reptile whose appetites--women, money, foolishly petty vengeance--dig him into trouble and his cowardice and knavery dig him back out. Narrating the story from many, many years later, he has absolutely no illusions about his courage or honor or sense of duty--actually, a buried sense of shame--and this distance and perspective is the only thing that made me keep reading after about the twentieth page. Well, no, not the only thing. The wor [...]

    17. Harry Flashman is still rotten to the core but takes you on quite a trip as he carouses his way through England and Europe. Several laugh out loud moments as he impersonates a Danish prince on his wedding night (the prince's, not Flashman's) and tries to escape the clutches of Bismarck. Especially entertaining was his description of fox hunting and his "education" in how to pull off an impressive scam. My favorite lines are:(speaking of Bismarck) "I also learned that he had a wife in the capital [...]

    18. I had harsh words for the character of Flashman after I read the first book in George MacDonald Fraser's series. But there was something that compelled me to seek out more of his (mis)adventures and so I picked up Royal Flash from the library. Maybe it's that the novel is a pastiche of one of my childhood favorites, The Prisoner of Zenda, or that Flashman is less a victim of his own worst instincts than of the machinations of others. Regardless, I found him less loathsome and more the likable (t [...]

    19. For a long time people had expounded the brilliance of the flashman and the books are damn fine to read, i don't think it needs me or anyone else to write a review saying about the high quality of the writing and characters but for me the real brilliance comes to the fore when the book is read by the likes of Rupert Penry-Jones.I love to listen to the Flashman books on audio format when im on holiday, the only issue i have is to make sure i dont start talking like a Victorian cad whilst going to [...]

    20. We had moved here and this proved topical. It was a humid summer and the house was gradually coming together. I'd come home from work and then attend to some task, usually making quite the mess. I lack facility in such matters. I read a number of story collections that summer, I also read a Flashman. The novel's layered plot I found engaging, though not the execution thereof. Who can complain about a protagonist whose favorite verb is roger? Sure, the politics are incredibly reactionary and the [...]

    21. The second Flashman novel, and as excellent as the first. Despite even the character himself saying he's nothing but a cad and a bully, I actually like him, and let's face it, would any of us behave any differently given the situations he faced? In this story, Flashy gets hoodwinked into helping Otto Bismark engineer all sorts of dastardly deeds in what will eventually become Germany. Thoroughly entertaining, with lots of fights, escapes and beautiful women along the way.

    22. Something about reading about Flashy running around Eastern Europe, drinking and carrying on, can be a little dangerous; particularly when you are running around Eastern Europe. This is another wonderful Flashman book, our hero may be without his whiskers but that does not stop him from romping with chambermaids, acting the cad and behaving very badly in the face of danger.

    23. bbc/iplayer/episode/Celebrated cavalry officer Harry Flashman is caught with his trousers down in a London club. Read by Iain Cuthbertson.Loosely based on The Prisoner of Zenda

    24. The second Flashman novel is slightly better than the first, at least in my humble opinion. Focusing in more personal affairs and some skullduggery instead of losing itself in macropolitical dabbling, Royal Flash is more of a pulp-spy novel and good fun.

    25. Read any of the Flashman series if you enjoy a great read of fiction based upon fact. GM Fraser is the best, he often has you holding your gut you're laughing so hard.Certainly the best series I've ever had th epleasure of reading.Ringo

    26. Thank you Bettie - loving this! What fun this was, loved the self deprecation and humour of Flashman

    27. this one was a movie and the book is better. read it. love the rascal that is Harry Flashman! hard to put down or forget.

    28. The second volume in the 'Flashman' series is a great romping yarn that riffs off 'The Prisoner of Zenda', with a nod to the politics of German reunification and some sexual shenanigans with the legendary Lola Montez. As usual MacDonald Fraser fills this novel with lots of historical references, and whilst the contextualisation of more prominent events (e.g. the revolutions of 1848) are very helpful, what brings the book alive historically are the small details and the historical pop culture ref [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *